Tag: Robert E Lee

Cultural Stalinists suffer rout in Virginia

Generals Lee and Jackson won some great military victories during the War Between the States. This week, they won another.

The Hanover School Board voted 5-2 on Tuesday night to keep the names and mascots of Lee-Davis High School (Confederates) and Stonewall Jackson Middle School (Rebels) after a monthslong process in which the majority of county residents urged the board to leave the names undisturbed.

Voting in favor of keeping the names were Sue Dibble of the South Anna District, Roger Bourassa of the Mechanicsville District, Norman Sulser of the Cold Harbor District, John Axselle III of the Beaverdam District and Robert Hundley Jr. of the Chickahominy District.

Oh the poor, poor erasers of history must be crushed. Good! They deserve it frankly. Lee, and Jackson were decent honorable men and no one with even a basic grasp of these men would ever think they were anything but honorable. 

Conservatives ought to have a better grasp of history

Writing at The Federalist, Kyle Sammin shows a lack of knowledge about the War Between the States and about Robert E. Lee that astounds me. Sammin is not some reactionary leftist. Far from it. Yet, he sounds like a mis-educated non-thinker in his piece calling for a reconsideration of Lee

The answer lies somewhere in between the two extremes of neo-Confederate reactionaries and Antifa memory-holers. As radical as they are, lefty extremists’ position is at least useful in making us rethink the elevation of Confederate leaders to heights that, even ignoring the fact that they bore arms against the United States, would be undeserved.

I would assume that Sammin is calling “neo-Confederate reactionaries” leftists? To be entirely honest, I am not sure what Sammin means by neo-Confederate reactionaries. Certainly he cannot mean members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, or the United daughters of the Confederacy. I have belonged to the SCV in both Florida and Texas. The people I met were very dedicated to history, preserving it, and honoring ancestors. Many were involved in reenactments, and went to schools, educating kids about the war, the soldiers, etc. In short good people, and good Conservatives. Many of the same people I knew from the SCV and UDC I saw at Tea Party events. Perhaps Sammin could benefit by attending some SCV meetings?

Now to his historical blindspots. First of all Sammin attempts to belittle Lee as a field general, many modern “historians” seem to take this approach.  

In the decades following the Civil War, proponents of the Lost Cause myth created legends of men who were often merely mediocre. Nowhere is that more true than in the near-deification of Gen. Robert E. Lee.

I would say many legendary figure did emerge from that war, and many great men as well. Lee would be at the top of my list. No, he was not perfect but he was a devoted family man, a great general, an honorable man who ONLY fought after Virginia seceded. To call Lee mediocre is simply sad. By the way, Virginia’s decision to secede was not focused on slavery. One thing drove Virginia to seek seperation. Lincoln’s demand that Virginia raise troops to force Confederate states back into  aunion they no longer wished to belong to. Mr. Sammin might also note that Arkansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina also secceded after Lincolns call for them to raise troops.

This reminds me that after Virinia seceded, the people of the western part of that state chose to secede and become their own state. Would Sammin force Virginia to be reunited? Would he support the right of those he chose to form a new state? Clearly Sammin believes that secession was not a right for states in 1861. Would he also deny those western virginia people the right?

Sammin also seems to fall into the North good South bad mindset. Generally people do this because they see slavery, and only slavery as the only cause of the war on both sides. By doing so these folks miss out on grasping the broad spectrums of causes/issues of the war. I have a piece by Walter Williams I will quote from that would greatly benefit Sammin. 

Did the South have a right to secede from the Union? If it did, we can’t label Confederate generals as traitors.

Article 1 of the Treaty of Paris (1783), which ended the war between the Colonies and Great Britain, held “New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, to be free sovereign and Independent States.” Representatives of these states came together in Philadelphia in 1787 to write a constitution and form a union.

During the ratification debates, Virginia’s delegates said, “The powers granted under the Constitution being derived from the people of the United States may be resumed by them whensoever the same shall be perverted to their injury or oppression.” The ratification documents of New York and Rhode Island expressed similar sentiments.

At the Constitutional Convention, a proposal was made to allow the federal government to suppress a seceding state. James Madison, the “Father of the Constitution,” rejected it. The minutes from the debate paraphrased his opinion: “A union of the states containing such an ingredient (would) provide for its own destruction. The use of force against a state would look more like a declaration of war than an infliction of punishment and would probably be considered by the party attacked as a dissolution of all previous compacts by which it might be bound.”

Here is a key part

The U.S. Constitution would have never been ratified — and a union never created — if the people of those 13 “free sovereign and Independent States” did not believe that they had the right to secede. Even on the eve of the War of 1861, unionist politicians saw secession as a right that states had. Rep. Jacob M. Kunkel of Maryland said, “Any attempt to preserve the union between the states of this Confederacy by force would be impractical and destructive of republican liberty.” The Northern Democratic and Republican parties favored allowing the South to secede in peace.

The question to ponder is would the Founders have created a union so strong as to deny the right of the people of the States, which all proclaimed their sovereignty proudly, to secede? That seems difficult for me to believe. Even Lincoln, at least at one time believed in such a right

“Any people anywhere, being inclined and having the power, have the right to rise up, and shake off the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable – a most sacred right – a right, which we hope and believe, is to liberate the world.”

In the end history, our American story must be preseved, and yes, debated when necessary. I would glady welcome debate with Mr. Sammin anytime. And likely we would still disagree at the debates end. But what the left is currently doing is not debate, discussion, or civil discourse. It is cultural and historical genocide. That must never be allowed. And preserving history means fighting back against those that are trying to erase it. One sure way to destroy a nation is to destroy its history. that, we cannot allow!

What would Stonewall Jackson do?

General Thomas Johnathan “Stonewall” Jackson was a complex man. A doting, loving father, a devoted husband, a Christian, and a fierce warrior, and military genius. I thought of Jackson, and his last battle, Chancellorsville, in which Jackson’s commander, General Robert E. Lee, whose Army of Northern Virginia was outnumbered 134,000 to 57,000 delivered a severe bearing to Union General Joseph Hookers Army of the Potomac In that battle, Jackson performed a brilliant flank attack on Hookers army on May 2, 1863. During the attack, Jackson continually gave his usual admonition for his troops to “press on, press on, press them”. Jackson understood, as did his commander, General Lee that winning a war depended on achieving total military victory.

I thought of Jackson’s words as I read this, from Israeli leader Bejamin Netanyahu

No ceasefire:

Israel will press its air and ground offensive in the Gaza Strip, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Monday, preparing his country for a longer and bloodier campaign and dashing hopes that the three-week-old conflict would end soon.
Rebuffing appeals from President Obama, the United Nations and others for an immediate cease-fire, Netanyahu said in a televised address, “We will not finish the mission, we will not finish the operation, without neutralizing the tunnels” through which Hamas fighters have sought to infiltrate Israel. The tunnels, he said, “have the sole purpose of destroying our citizens, killing our children.”
Israel’s antagonist, the Islamist militant organization Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip, continued to unleash deadly mortar and rocket fire, triggering air raid sirens across Israel.

Netanyahu, like Jackson, understands that the enemy must be DEFEATED! Obviously, in the case of Jackson, his army was not fighting barbarians stuck in the Seventh Century. He battled against many honorable men, and Jackson, like Lee wanted to achieve peace through military victories that would lead to peace with the North. Israel, on the other hand can have no peace if Hamas is left intact, Hamas, and other terror groups ARE Seventh Century barbarians. Netanyahu grasps that Israel faces life and death every day, a fact seemingly lost on the modern day Neville Chamberlains of the “International Community” and Team Obama. So, I hope, and pray that Israel, as a nation follows the advice of General Jackson, Press on! And, if men like Lee and Jackson, and the Union soldiers of the day  lived today, I am sure be very quick to proudly proclaim that they Stand With Israel. The several thousand Jews in Lee’s army would likely be itching to go to Israel to defend that wonderful, freedom loving nation. I bet the Rebel Yell would be much feared by Hamas

 

40 Confederate soldiers to receive proper burial

May they rest in peace, finally

Their remains sat, unmarked, in shallow graves at the Old City Cemetery in Lynchburg, Va., for decades. Now, two centuries after the Civil War, the bodies of 40 Confederate soldiers discovered over the past two months will receive a proper memorial. 

“It’s been very meaningful to us to find these spots, identify these soldiers and bring closure to families,” said Ted Delaney, the cemetery’s assistant director, who, along with a team of archaeologists, uncovered the exact resting place of some 40 Confederate soldiers as well as the plots where Union soldiers were once buried and later exhumed.

Delaney told FoxNews.com that, beginning in April, the team dug a 45-by-10-foot trench within “Yankee Square” at the cemetery where they found a mix of red and orange squares, which they determined were Confederate soldiers’ graves. He said 35 to 40 graves were found during this latest search and that 50 were uncovered in the same area last year.

Delaney said he is now tasked with identifying each soldier’s grave and giving it the tribute it deserves. 

“Our goal is to put a marker at each grave space to identify the soldier and note when he died and his military unit,” said Delaney, who is optimistic about the project because, “the undertaker’s notes are so detailed and complete.” 

He said that when all is done, about 80 Confederate soldiers will be properly identified. He noted that the remains of Union soldiers were exhumed and removed from the plot of land in 1866.

“This has been an incredible process of discovery,” he said. “It’s always been very frustrating for those descendents who come to us because they can’t find their ancestor’s grave. Now we can bring some of them closure.” 

As a final tribute, here is a word that clearly defines why they fought

Here we go again, more Leftist bullies

Seven ill-educated and misguided students at Washington 7 Lee University are offended by Robert E. Lee and are demanding “Tolerance” or something

Some Washington & Lee University law students want the university to live by its honor code and stop glorifying its namesake by acknowledging the dishonorable side of both Robert E. Lee and W&L.

Seven multiracial students, calling themselves The Committee, have demanded that W&L remove the flags of the Confederacy from the campus and Lee Chapel, acknowledge and apologize for participating in chattel slavery, recognize Martin Luther King Day on the undergraduate campus and ban neo-Confederates from marching across campus to the chapel on Lee-Jackson Day.

If their demands are not met by Sept. 1, they will engage in civil disobedience.

University President Kenneth Ruscio on Wednesday issued a letter to the W&L community that said “we take these students’ concerns seriously. The issues they have raised are important, and we intend to address them.”

Ruscio said W&L invites a prominent speaker during MLK Legacy Week; the undergraduate faculty decides whether classes are held on MLK day; the eight battle flags in Lee Chapel, representing armies of the Confederate States of America, are educational and historical, and the university does not observe Lee-Jackson Day.

His message did not indicate whether W&L would meet any of the students’ demands, but that he invited them to meet with the University Committee on Inclusiveness and Campus Climate that has been holding focus groups on these same issues.

The students said that they emailed the committee four days ago and had yet to hear a response.

The university should tell these seven cry babies to learn something about Lee. If they did they would likely be ashamed of themselves. He was an honorable man, who fought for his home, and who considered slavery an abomination, and did his best to heal the country after the war. He was also a proponent of freeing the slaves during the war, and a man who deserves to have his memory taught in total, and not through the prism of Leftist fantasy.

Generals Lee and Jackson targeted by the Central Planners

Via Moonbattery

It isn’t only lead characters on popular cable shows who need to be erased if they don’t conform to the currently enforced ideology. Historical figures need to go too — even some of the most important:

The U.S. Army War College, which molds future field generals, has begun discussing whether it should remove its portraits of Confederate generals — including those of Robert E. Lee and Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson.

Was the war fought to preserve the Union or to subjugate the South? If the American heroes Lee and Jackson become unpersons, we will finally have a definitive answer.

In the end, not only the South but our entire civilization will be erased if we fail to cure it of the totalitarian mindset of those who insist that every aspect of life must comply with liberalism.

Shameful

 

Why are ignorant buffoons allowed to write columns for the Washington Post?

I ask this question only because I happened upon a historically inaccurate piece, written by John Kelly, who is, by trade, a columnist for the Washington Post. His latest piece expresses shock, shock I say, that Generals Jackson and Lee are honored as Christian soldiers at the National Cathedral

On Wednesday, mourners will gather at Washington National Cathedral to celebrate the legacy of Nelson Mandela, a man who fought for racial equality. I’m guessing most of them will have no idea they’re sitting in a place that has shrines to two people who fought against it.

I certainly know I was surprised when I learned recently that two memorial niches — complete with stained-glass windows and laudatory inscriptions — honor Confederate generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson.

Well, I am unsure where the notion that Jackson and Lee were “against” racial equality. At least any more than Saint Lincoln did. His thoughts on the inferiority of the Black race are well documented. Not that Lincoln was alone in those thoughts in the mid 19th Century. But more to the point about Jackson and Lee and their views on race. Jackson ran a school in Lexington, Virginia educating Blacks, Historian Richard William’s book on this school is a must read for those who, like Kelly, are historically clueless. Here is a link to a stories about Jackson and Lee that Kelly should also read especially this part

One Sunday in June of 1865, just after the war ended, St. Paul’s Episcopal, was packed with folks leaning on each other and God for understanding about what their future held. But they could never have imagined what would happen during the service.

When the pastor began to serve communion, a well-dressed black man came forward first.

It would be an understatement to say that the event caused a few awkward moments among the white congregants. They remained seated, except one man who went forward and knelt near him.

That man was General Robert E. Lee

The general’s actions come as no surprise to noted Civil War historian James Robertson, who says Lee was a man of duty and faith.

“His duty was to his native state, both in war and in peace,” Robertson, a history professor at Virginia Tech, said. “His faith was very deep-seated. And I think Lee was simply exhibiting both. He knew that the South had been crushed, defeated, humiliated. He knew he had a duty to himself, to his God to help reconstruct his beloved Virginia as much as he could.”

The rest of the congregation followed Lee’s example and took communion as well.

Jackson: The Black Man’s Friend?

But it’s a stained glass window that represents one of the greatest ironies of the Civil War. The window honors another prominent Confederate general: Stonewall Jackson.

The window is not in a museum. It’s proudly displayed in the predominantly black Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church in Roanoke, Va.

The church’s founding pastor Rev. Lylburn Downing designed the window in 1906 to honor Jackson for leading his parents to faith in Christ when they were slave children.

Prior to the Civil War, Jackson was a professor at the Virginia Military Institute, and a deacon at the Lexington Presbyterian Church.

In 1855, the man who would become one of the Civil War’s most famous generals, began a Sunday school class for black children, slave and free.

Downing’s father and mother were among his many students.

“As he saw it, slavery was something that God ordained upon black people in America for God’s own reasons,” Robertson said. “And he had no right to challenge God’s will. That was blasphemy. And so, while he hated slavery, he was opposed to slavery, Jackson had to obey his Heavenly Father and accept the system. And he accepted it through doing the Golden Rule, do unto others as he would wish they do unto him.”

Professor Miller believes Jackson’s justification of slavery on biblical grounds was wrong.

“Yet in the midst of all of that, I think that people can do good stuff, maybe for all the wrong reasons, but motivated by sincere hearts,” he said.

That sincerity is confirmed by the fact that Jackson was willing to break Virginia law by teaching the class. Even after the war began, Jackson sent money back to the church to keep the class going.

Richard Williams has documented Jackson’s ministry in a book called, Stonewall Jackson: The Black Man’s Friend.

He says the Sunday school class had a generational impact.

” a number of scholars, as Jackson referred to his students, that went on to become ministers,” Williams said. “There were four churches established, three in Lexington and then this one. Two of those churches in Lexington are still vibrant ministries today.”

And when a statue at Jackson’s gravesite in Lexington was erected in 1891, it was one of Jackson’s scholars-turned-pastor who made the first contribution.

How do the members of Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church feel about a stained glass window honoring a Confederate general?

Freeland Pendleton, who’s been a member of the church most of his life, says he has no problem with it.

“The reason I was okay with it because he had the courage to teach us, teach blacks to read and write,” Pendleton said. “Whether he was fighting for slavery, or whatever, he did do a good thing.”

You can go read the rest of Kelly’s column, it is sad, very sad, that someone would choose to write a column on subject’s he knows little about.