Tag: Potential

Ed’s Cabinet/Agency Leadership Suggestions For A Potential Trump/Cruz Administration


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EXECUTIVE OFFICES
President: Donald Trump – Real Estate Tycoon
Vice President: Ted Cruz – U.S. Senator

CABINET/OTHER KEY OFFICES
Chief Of Staff: Jeffrey Lord – Former Associate Political Director For The Reagan Administration
Secretary Of State: John Bolton – Former U.S. Ambassador To The United Nations
Attorney General: Trey Gowdy – U.S. Congressman
Secretary Of Defense: James Mattis – Retired 4-Star Marine Corps General
Secretary Of Homeland Security: Frank Gaffney – Founder And President Of The Center For Security Policy
Secretary Of Treasury: Thomas Sowell – Senior Fellow At The Hoover Institution
Secretary Of Education: Newt Gingrich – Former Speaker Of The U.S. House Of Representatives
Secretary Of Health And Human Services: Ben Carson – Former Director Of Pediatric Neurosurgery At Johns Hopkins Medical Center
Director Of National Intelligence: Keith Alexander – Retired 4-Star Army General
Secretary Of Veterans Affairs: Allen West – Former U.S. Congressman
Secretary Of Transportation: Ted Houghton – Former Chairman Of The Texas Transportation Commission
Secretary Of Energy: Tom Tanton – Executive Director Of The American Tradition Institute
Secretary Of The Interior: Sarah Palin – Former Governor Of Alaska
Director Of Immigration And Customs Enforcement: Joe Arpaio – Sheriff Of Maricopa County, Arizona
Chairman Of The Federal Reserve: Mark Thornton – Senior Fellow At The Ludwig Von Mises Institute
Director Of The Office Of Management And Budget: Romina Boccia – Grover M. Hermann Fellow In Federal Budgetary Affairs For The Heritage Foundation
U.S. Trade Representative: Carl Icahn – Business Magnate
Press Secretary: Lou Dobbs – Television News Commentator

OFFICES THAT SHOULD BE ABOLISHED
Department Of Agriculture
Department Of Commerce
Department Of Labor
Department Of Housing And Urban Development
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

NEW OFFICES THAT SHOULD BE CREATED
Secretary Of Free Market Capitalism: Arthur Brooks – President Of The American Enterprise Institute
Director Of Government Downsizing: Thomas Schatz – President Of Citizens Against Government Waste

POTENTIAL SUPREME COURT JUSTICE NOMINEES
William Pryor – Judge On The U.S. Court Of Appeals For The Eleventh Circuit
Diane Sykes – Judge On The U.S. Court Of Appeals For The Seventh Circuit
Roy Moore – Chief Justice Of The Alabama Supreme Court
A. Raymond Randolph – Judge On The U.S. Court Of Appeals For The Washington, DC Circuit

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Feds Waste Nearly $40 Million Of Potential Ebola Funding On Origami Condoms And Fat Lesbians

$39,643,352 Worth Of NIH Funding That Could Have Gone To The Ebola Vaccine – Washington Free Beacon

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The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has spent more than $39 million on obese lesbians, origami condoms, texting drunks, and dozens of other projects that could have been scrapped in favor of developing an Ebola vaccine.

“Frankly, if we had not gone through our 10-year slide in research support, we probably would have had a vaccine in time for this that would’ve gone through clinical trials and would have been ready,” said NIH Director Francis Collins, blaming budget cuts for his agency’s failure to develop a vaccine for the deadly virus.

However, the Washington Free Beacon has uncovered $39,643,352 worth of NIH studies within the past several years that have gone to questionable research.

For instance, the agency has spent $2,873,440 trying to figure out why lesbians are obese, and $466,642 on why fat girls have a tough time getting dates. Another $2,075,611 was spent encouraging old people to join choirs.

Millions have gone to “text message interventions,” including a study where researchers sent texts to drunks at the bar to try to get them to stop drinking. The project received an additional grant this year, for a total of $674,590.

The NIH is also texting older African Americans with HIV ($372,460), HIV and drug users in rural areas ($693,000), HIV smokers ($763,519), pregnant smokers ($380,145), teen moms ($243,839), and meth addicts ($360,113). Text message interventions to try to get obese people to lose weight have cost $2,707,067.

The NIH’s research on obesity has led to spending $2,101,064 on wearable insoles and buttons that can track a person’s weight, and $374,670 to put on fruit and vegetable puppet shows for preschoolers.

A restaurant intervention to develop new children’s menus cost $275,227, and the NIH spent $430,608 for mother-daughter dancing outreach to fight obesity.

Sexual minorities have received a substantial amount from the NIH. The agency has now spent $105,066 following 16 schizophrenic LGBT Canadians around Toronto for a study on their community experiences.

The total for a project on why gay men get syphilis in Peru is now $692,697 after receiving additional $228,425 this year. The NIH is also concerned about postpartum depression in “invisible sexual minority women,” with a study that has cost $718,770.

Millions went to develop “origami condoms,” in male, female, and anal versions. The inventor Danny Resnic, who received $2,466,482 from the NIH, has been accused of massive fraud for using grant money for full-body plastic surgery in Costa Rica and parties at the Playboy mansion.

How transwomen use Facebook is the subject of another NIH study worth $194,788.

The agency has also committed $5 million to “mine and analyze” social media to study American’s attitudes toward drug abuse, and $306,900 to use Twitter for surveillance on depressed people.

The NIH has also spent $15,313,372 on cessation studies devoted to every kind of smoker imaginable. Current studies are targeted at American Indians ($2,899,954); Chinese and Vietnamese men ($424,875); postmenopausal women ($4,151,850); the homeless ($558,576);Korean youth ($94,580); young schizophrenics ($397,802); Brazilian women smokers ($955,368);Latino HIV-positive smokers($471,530); and the LGBT community ($2,364,521).

Yale University is studying how to get “Heavy Drinkers” to stop smoking at a cost of $571,799. Other projects seek to use Twitter to provide “social support to smokers” ($659,469), and yoga ($1,763,048) as a way to quit.

An NIH project studying sighs cost taxpayers $53,282.

On Tuesday, Health and Human Services (HHS) had to outsource efforts at an Ebola vaccine to the Baltimore-based Profectus BioSciences Inc. The company will receive $8.6 million to research and test their vaccine, a fraction of NIH funding that went to the above projects.

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Soldiers Who Served With Potential Traitor Bowe Bergdahl Not Yet Contacted By Military Investigators

Soldiers Who Served With Bowe Bergdahl Not Yet Contacted By Military Investigators – Fox News

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U.S. Army soldiers who were serving with Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl when he left his post and wound up in the hands of the Taliban say no one has contacted them, even though military brass are currently conducting a new investigation into the case.

Several soldiers who immediately came forward after Bergdahl was released on May 31, in a swap for five Guantanamo Bay detainees, have accused the 28-year-old Idaho native of deserting. But even though the Army is probing that very charge, investigators have not reached out to at least two former Army sergeants – including the platoon’s leader – who served alongside Bergdahl on June 30, 2009, when he disappeared from his post in eastern Afghanistan’s Paktika province.

“There’s only a handful of us who were actually there and we haven’t been contacted yet,” former Army Sgt. Evan Buetow told FoxNews.com. “I don’t really know how in-depth they’re trying to get here. I thought we’d be some of the people they’d call. I think they have their mind made up already on what they want people to know.”

Army officials announced last week that a two-star general, Maj. Gen. Kenneth Dahl, is conducting a new investigation to examine whether Bergdahl went AWOL or deserted his post. Legally, a deserter has no intention of returning to his or her post, while a soldier who goes AWOL intends to rejoin. The probe won’t begin until Bergdahl’s reintegration process is complete, and Dahl’s recommendations will ultimately be sent to the director of the Army staff, who could then approve or alter them before forwarding to Bergdahl’s commander.

For Buetow, who is now working in law enforcement after leaving the Army in 2012, the answer to the key question of the investigation remains unchanged.

“I think it’s very clear he deserted his post,” Buetow told FoxNews.com. “He thought about what he was doing, he mailed some things home, he walked away and we have witnesses who saw him walking away. And if you’re walking away in one of the worst, most dangerous areas of Afghanistan without your weapon and gear, I don’t believe you’re planning on coming back.”

Former Army Sgt. Matt Vierkant, a member of Bergdahl’s unit, told FoxNews.com he has also not been contacted by Army officials since the announcement of the new probe, but acknowledged that sworn statements of nearly every soldier in contact with Bergdahl in 2009 undoubtedly still exist.

“I have confidence that they’re going to do what’s right,” Vierkant said. “I just feel this should’ve happened a long time ago and it should’ve been public.”

Vierkant vehemently maintains that Bergdahl deserted his unit, taking little more than his notebook, a compass, some water and maybe his camera before walking away.

“The most important factor isn’t necessarily why he did it or what made him do it,” Vierkant said. “The most important factor is that he did do it – for whatever reason. That’s enough in my mind to do a court-martial, bring him up under several different charges under the Uniform Code of Military Justice.”

Vierkant said he expects only more damaging evidence to surface regarding Bergdahl during this latest probe, including proof of his intent or even collaboration with insurgents while in captivity. U.S. officials have said Bergdahl was largely held in Pakistan by members of the Haqqani network, which has close ties to the Taliban. Bergdahl is now receiving outpatient care at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio and has reportedly ventured off base several times as part of his reintegration process.

If Army officials determine Bergdahl deserted his troops, Buetow said he should be court-martialed, demoted and dishonorably discharged. Bergdahl was a “good soldier,” someone to be trusted in the trenches, Buetow said, but something was always slightly off with the quiet infantryman.

“He was always on time, always had the gear he had to have and he studied more than any other soldier I’ve ever had,” he said. “He was odd though. He was very quiet, didn’t watch TV, studied about four languages, and didn’t want to go out with the guys. He kind of isolated himself, but not in a way that would be concerning. And no one pushed him away.”

Buetow said it was no surprise that Bergdahl – who asked “endless questions” about protocol and military tactics – was the soldier who was gone when Army brass realized he was missing.

“The fact that he walked away and the fact that he was the one who was gone wasn’t surprising,” Buetow said. “I remember it got called out that Bergdahl had left the bunker and I looked over at my buddy Cody Full and we looked at each other and said, ‘He’s gone, he’s gone.'”

Army officials told FoxNews.com that, in general, the investigating officer in such a probe will review any materials that are provided.

“The investigating officer will come up with an investigative plan, figure out which witnesses he or she needs to talk to in order to complete the investigation, and interview those witnesses,” Army spokeswoman Alayne Conway wrote in an email. “I have not seen the list of individuals, so can’t comment on who specifically the investigating officer will talk with nor the total number of personnel he will talk with. We don’t provide that level of detail while an investigation is ongoing.”

Buetow, meanwhile, questioned why he hasn’t yet received a phone call from investigators.

“They’ve already concluded what they want to be said,” he said of Army leaders. “They know exactly what happened.”

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Documents Show Lois Lerner Contacted Holder’s DOJ About Potential Prosecution Of Tax-Exempt Groups

JW Obtains IRS Documents Showing Lerner In Contact With DOJ About Potential Prosecution Of Tax-Exempt Groups – Judicial Watch

Judicial Watch today released a new batch of internal IRS documents revealing that former IRS official Lois Lerner communicated with the Department of Justice (DOJ) about whether it was possible to criminally prosecute certain tax-exempt entities. The documents were obtained as a result of an October 2013 Judicial Watch Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit filed against the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) after the agency refused to respond to four FOIA requests dating back to May 2013.

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The newly released IRS documents contain an email exchange between Lerner and Nikole C. Flax, then-Chief of Staff to then-Acting-IRS Commissioner Steven T. Miller discussing plans to work with the DOJ to prosecute nonprofit groups that “lied” (Lerner’s quotation marks) about political activities. The exchange includes the following:

May 8, 2013: Lerner to Flax

I got a call today from Richard Pilger Director Elections Crimes Branch at DOJ… He wanted to know who at IRS the DOJ folks [sic] could talk to about Sen. Whitehouse idea at the hearing that DOJ could piece together false statement cases about applicants who “lied” on their 1024s – saying they weren’t planning on doing political activity, and then turning around and making large visible political expenditures. DOJ is feeling like it needs to respond, but want to talk to the right folks at IRS to see whether there are impediments from our side and what, if any damage this might do to IRS programs.

I told him that sounded like we might need several folks from IRS…

May 9, 2013: Flax to Lerner

I think we should do it – also need to include CI [Criminal Investigation Division], which we can help coordinate. Also, we need to reach out to FEC. Does it make sense to consider including them in this or keep it separate?

Lerner then “handed off” scheduling the issue to Senior Technical Adviser, Attorney Nancy Marks, who was then supposed to set up the meeting with the DOJ. Lerner also decided that it would be DOJ’s decision as to whether representatives from the Federal Election Commission would attend.

Democratic Rhode Island Senator Sheldon Whitehouse had held a hearing on April 9 during which, “in questioning the witnesses from DOJ and IRS, Whitehouse asked why they have not prosecuted 501(c)(4) groups that have seemingly made false statements about their political activities.” Lerner described the impetus for this hearing in a March 27, 2013, email to top IRS staff:

As I mentioned yesterday – there are several groups of folks from the FEC world that are pushing tax fraud prosecution for c4s who report they are not conducting political activity when they are (or these folks think they are). One is my ex-boss Larry Noble (former General Counsel at the FEC), who is now president of Americans for Campaign Reform. This is their latest push to shut these down. One IRS prosecution would make an impact and they wouldn’t feel so comfortable doing the stuff.

So, don’t be fooled about how this is being articulated – it is ALL about 501(c)(4) orgs and political activity.

But in an email sent a few minutes earlier, Lerner acknowledged prosecutions would evidently be at odds with the law:

Whether there was a false statement or fraud regarding an [sic] description of an alleged political expenditure that doesn’t say vote for or vote against is not realistic under current law. Everyone is looking for a magic bullet or scapegoat – there isn’t one. The law in this area is just hard.

The documents also include email exchanges showing that before Lerner’s May 10, 2013, speech to the American Bar Association blaming “low-level” employees in Cincinnati for targeting tax-exempt organizations, the IRS Exempt Organizations division was scrambling to defuse the emerging targeting scandal:

May 1, 2013: After receiving an email from an assistant showing that 501(c)(4) applications had increased from 1591 in 2010 to 3398 in 2012 , Lerner wrote back, “Looks to me like 2010-2012 doubled too. Oh well – thanks.”

May 2, 2013: Discussing an upcoming conference call with approximately 100 congressional staffers on May 22, Lerner cautions aides, “Need to be careful not to mention sequester/furlough unless asked although can allude to budget and resources restraints.”

May 2, 2013: In response to an email reminding her about the upcoming conference call with congressional staffers, Lerner responded, “Arrgh – I just saw it. Sharon [White] could skate, but Cindy [Thomas] is the person who could answer that stuff. We need to give them some type of language in the event that type of question comes up” [apparently in reference to earlier email referencing “sensitive issues”].

The new documents obtained by Judicial Watch also include emails exchanged after Lerner’s May 10 ABA speech:

May 10, 2013: In an email to an aide responding to a request for information from a Washington Post reporter, Lerner admits that she “can’t confirm that there was anyone on the other side of the political spectrum” who had been targeted by the IRS. She then adds that “The one with the names used were only know [sic] because they have been very loud in the press.”

May 10, 2013: An email from former Cincinnati program manager Cindy Thomas excoriates Lerner for her comments blaming “low-level” employees in its Cincinnati office for targeting tax-exempt organizations that had “Tea Party” or “Patriots” in their names during the 2012 election. Highlighting the words “low-level workers” in bold-face type each of the seven times she used it in short, pungent email, Thomas asked, “How am I supposed to keep the low-level workers motivated when the public believes they are nothing more than low-level workers and now will have no respect for how they are working cases?” Lerner’s response nearly an hour later was a terse, “I will be back shortly and give you a call.”

May 15, 2013: In an email from an aide to Lerner, the aide specifically mentions “Tea Party Organizations”, the “Tea Party movement,” and “Tea Party Patriots” as organizations targeted by the IRS.

The Judicial Watch FOIA requests came on the heels of an explosive May 14, 2013, Treasury Inspector General report revealing that the IRS had singled out groups with conservative-sounding terms such as “patriot” and “Tea Party” in their titles when applying for tax-exempt status. The IG probe determined that “Early in Calendar Year 2010, the IRS began using inappropriate criteria to identify organizations applying for tax-exempt status to (e.g., lists of past and future donors).” According to the report, the illegal IRS reviews continued for more than 18 months and “delayed processing of targeted groups’ applications” preparing for the 2012 presidential election.

Lerner, who headed the IRS division that handles applications for tax-exempt status, refused to testify at a May 2013 hearing before Rep. Darrell Issa’s (R-CA) House Oversight Committee, demanding immunity concerning her role in the targeting scandal. Lerner retired from the IRS with full benefits on September 23 after an internal investigation found she was guilty of “neglect of duties” and was going to call for her ouster, according to news reports. On April 9, 2014, the Ways and Means Committee referred Lois Lerner to the DOJ for criminal prosecution. On April 10, 2014, the House Oversight Committee voted to hold Lerner in contempt of Congress.

“These new emails show that the day before she broke the news of the IRS scandal, Lois Lerner was talking to a top Obama Justice Department official about whether the DOJ could prosecute the very same organizations that the IRS had already improperly targeted,” said Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton. “The IRS emails show Eric Holder’s Department of Justice is now implicated and conflicted in the IRS scandal. No wonder we had to sue in federal court to get these documents.”

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9 Potential Mass Shootings That Were Stopped By Someone With A Personally Owned Firearm

9 Potential Mass Shootings That Were Stopped By Someone With A Personally Owned Firearm – Buzzfeed

1. The Pearl High School shooting

Oct. 1, 1997
Luke Woodham fatally stabbed and bludgeoned his mother and went on to kill two students and injure seven others at his high school. Woodham was stopped by Assistant Principal Joel Myrick, a U.S. Army Reserve commander, who detained Woodham by using a .45 caliber semi-automatic pistol he kept in his truck, until authorities could show up.

Myrick stopped Woodham from going across the street to the middle school.

2. The Parker Middle School dance shooting

April 24, 1998
Andrew Wurst showed up to his middle school dance with his .25-caliber pistol. He fired it, killing a teacher, wounding a second one, and injuring two students. The 14-year-old’s shoot-out lasted about 20 minutes. It was ended when James Strand, the owner of the banquet hall the dance was happening in, confronted Wurst with his personal shotgun. He ordered Wurst to drop his weapon and held the teenager in place for 11 minutes before finally getting him to drop the weapon and lie on the ground, and then searched him for other weapons.

3. The Appalachian School of Law shooting

Jan. 16, 2002
A 43-year-old Nigerian former student named Peter Odighizuwa arrived on campus with a handgun. There are different variations of the story, but according to eyewitness accounts, law students Tracy Bridges, a county sheriff’s deputy, and Mikael Gross, a police officer, ran to their cars after hearing gunshots and grabbed personally owned firearms. They approached Odighizuwa, ordering him to drop his firearm; he did and was subdued by unarmed students.

Three people were killed and three others were wounded.

4. The New Life Church shooting

Dec. 9, 2007
A former police officer from Minnesota named Jeanne Assam was at church when a 24-year-old gunman named Matthew Murray began firing at parishioners in the parking lot. Murray claimed two victims before Assam opened fire on him with her personally owned concealed weapon. After receiving multiple hits from Assam, Murray then shot himself.

5. The Trolley Square shooting

Feb. 12, 2007
Sulejman Talović killed five people and wounded four others in 2007 when he began firing in a public square in Salt Lake City, Utah. He carried a shotgun and a backpack of ammunition. He was eventually stopped in a shoot-out involving Salt Lake City Police Department SWAT that took place in a Pottery Barn Kids. He was cornered, however, by off-duty police officer Kenneth Hammond, who held him in position before authorities could arrive.

Hammond ran on scene after hearing gunshots fire out while having an early Valentine’s Day dinner with his pregnant wife at a local restaurant.

6. The Golden Market shooting

July 19, 2009
The details are murky but according to reports, a man entered a Golden Market in Virginia in 2009 and began firing a gun. He shot and wounded the clerk and then began firing at patrons inside. He ran out of ammo and was attempting to reload when he was shot, wounded, and then subdued by a permit holder who happened to be in the store.

7. The New York Mills AT&T store shooting

May 27, 2010
Off-duty police officer Donald J. Moore stopped Abraham Dickan, a 79-year-old man who decided to shoot up an AT&T store in New York Mills, New York. Moore was in the store when Dickan entered brandishing a .357 magnum and a hit list of employees he planned to kill in his pocket. Moore heard Dickan’s gun go off, drew his own personal weapon, and killed Dickan on scene.

One AT&T employee was injured in the shooting.

8. The Clackamas Town Center shooting

Dec. 11, 2012
Two people were killed and a third was seriously wounded in Clackamas County, Oregon, when Jacob Roberts opened fire in a local shopping mall. Nick Meli, a shopper in the mall, drew a personally owned firearm on Roberts, who then retreated. Meli did not fire his weapon, for fear of striking bystanders.

9. The San Antonio Theater shooting

Dec. 16, 2012
In December of last year, gunfire broke out in a San Antonio movie theater. Moviegoers rushed to exits and ducked for cover as a lone gunman, Jesus Manuel Garcia, began shooting in a China Garden that spilled over into an attached movie complex. The San Antonio Police Department were fired at by the gunman and had to evacuate and seal off the complex.

The gunman was eventually shot and struck by an off-duty police officer, Lisa Castellano, who was working at the theater that night.

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Mississippi Investigating Potential $2.7 Million Food Stamp Fraud

Mississippi Checking Into Possible $2.7 Million Food Stamp Fraud – Mississippi Press

State officials say 1,705 people in Mississippi were disqualified last budget year from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program for making false claims and improperly taking more than $2.7 million in benefits.

The Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal reports that hundreds more people routinely report benefits cards lost or stolen, which the federal government cites as a potential sign of fraud.

“There are many legitimate reasons for replacing cards and the vast majority of recipients follow the rules,” said U.S. Agriculture Undersecretary Kevin Concannon in a news release. “But we are concerned that a few bad actors are using replacement cards to exchange SNAP benefits for cash, commonly referred to as trafficking.”

Mississippi enrollment in SNAP is 698,279, or 23 percent of the state’s population. The numbers have more than doubled from the start of the century, when 10 percent of Mississippians, or 276,074 residents, received food stamps.

The Mississippi Department of Human Services first began tracking multiple replacement card requests during the budget year that ran from July 1, 2011, through June 30, 2012, said agency spokeswoman Julia Bryan.

DHS said 263 households reported cards missing five or more times. The highest number of replacements requested by a single cardholder was 17.

For comparison, Renasant Bank spokesman John Oxford said his company typically issues replacement debit cards to 10 percent of its cardholders annually but almost never issues more than one in a single year.

“Twice is an anomaly,” Oxford said. “Five or six times is almost unheard of. It would be very, very rare.”

Although DHS has a fraud investigations office that looks into hundreds of cases of potential misconduct each year, multiple card requests don’t automatically trigger an investigation. Instead, the agency sends each household a notice warning them of the penalties for fraud, Bryan said. Federal regulations limit contact between state agencies and SNAP recipients, according to Concannon, who this year proposed new regulations, including one that would allow states to make replacement card-seekers contact the agency after the fourth request in a year.

Today, though, DHS doesn’t know how many SNAP recipients legitimately lose their cards versus those who sell them.

“The way it is now, we can’t require them to come in and let us quiz them about why they lost their card,” said David Noble, DHS director of state operations.

Repeat card-losers include elderly people, those with mental issues or families who move multiple times in a year, said DHS economic assistance director Cathy Sykes. She said she’s aware some beneficiaries cheat the system.

“They’ll sell the card for $100 and they have, maybe, $200 on the card,” Sykes said. “Then they immediately report the card stolen and get the card disactivated.”

The person who sold the card then gets a new one with the remaining $200 balance transferred to it while pocketing the $100 swindled from the buyer. The buyer loses money with no way to legally reclaim it since it’s unlawful to purchase a benefits card in the first place.

Other times, beneficiaries sell the cards and wait a few days to report it lost to give the buyer time to use them. Although SNAP recipients lose the balance on those cards, they get cash to purchase items they otherwise can’t get using an electronic benefits transfer card.

Federal law restricts EBT card purchases to household food items. A card cannot be used to get alcohol, tobacco, medicine, hot foods or nonfood items like soap, light bulbs, diapers, pet food, clothes or school supplies.

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