Tag: Emails

Latest Hitlery Document Release Includes 155 Classified Emails, Bringing The Total To 343

Latest Clinton Document Release Includes 155 Now-Classified Emails – Daily Caller

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Among the 6,300 pages of Hillary Clinton emails released by the State Department on Wednesday are approximately 155 messages containing now-classified information that the former secretary of state sent or received on her unsecured, private email server system.

That raises the overall number of emails that contain information deemed to contain classified information to 343. The 155 figure is based on a preliminary analysis of the release.

The emails, most of which were classified as “confidential,” were sent in 2010 and 2011. Two records included in the release contain information that is now marked as “secret,” the second-highest classification category. One was an email Clinton aide Jake Sullivan sent to her on Jan. 21, 2011 regarding diplomatic talks in Turkey.

The State Department has asserted following previous Clinton email releases that information in the emails was not classified at the time the records were sent. But many observers have pushed back against the claim because many of the messages appear to discuss topics that were time- and event-specific.

Many of the emails contained information provided by foreign government officials. Executive orders have determined that such information should be “presumed” to be classified when originated.

Clinton herself has maintained that she did not send or receive emails containing information that was classified when sent. The Intelligence Community’s inspector general has disputed that claim, however, saying that it reviewed at least two emails that traversed Clinton’s server which contained information that was “top secret” at the time they were sent.

Wednesday’s release marks the fifth mass publication of Clinton emails. The first release, which occurred in May, was of nearly 300 pages of Clinton emails related to Libya and Benghazi. The other four releases were ordered by U.S. District Court judge Rudolph Contreras who is presiding over a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit filed by Vice News reporter Jason Leopold.

According to the State Department, 37 percent of Clinton’s emails have now been released, putting the agency ahead of a timeline set by Contreras.

Clinton turned over approximately 55,000 pages of her work-related emails to the State Department in December, nearly two years after leaving the agency.

Clinton herself sent a number of those now-classified emails. Wednesday’s release shows that Clinton sent at least two emails that contain sensitive information.

One was sent on March 6, 2010 and discussed Indonesia. The other was sent on March 4, 2010 and discussed Sergey Lavrov, Russia’s foreign minister.

The first four releases contained at least eight emails containing information now deemed classified.

The topics of those heavily-redacted emails included discussions about Iran, Egypt, and Futenma Marine Corps base in Japan.

One of the more mysterious now-classified emails Clinton sent was to her longtime friend and ally, Sidney Blumenthal.

On Nov. 10, 2009 Blumenthal forwarded an email from Joe Wilson, who served as an ambassador during the Bill Clinton administration. In the email, Wilson pitched Clinton on an African energy company for which he was consulting. Clinton’s response to Blumenthal is redacted and has been classified as “confidential.”

Blumenthal himself has been a central figure in the email scandal. He sent Clinton dozens of intelligence reports on her personal email address. Clinton initially claimed that Blumenthal’s emails were “unsolicited.” But Clinton’s responses to her friend indicated that that was not the case. Clinton often encouraged Blumenthal to keep her posted on geopolitical developments.

Clinton was caught in another inconsistency regarding Blumenthal. Though she has claimed that she turned over all of her work-related emails, Blumenthal provided the House Select Committee on Benghazi with at least 15 emails that he exchanged with Clinton which were not included in the trove she gave to the State Department. That gap raised questions over whether Clinton or the State Department failed to turn over the emails.

Last week, the State Department said it recently handed over an additional 900 Benghazi-related emails it has had since December.

It was also reported last week that Clinton failed to turn over an email exchange she had shortly after becoming secretary of state in early 2009 with then-CENTCOM Commander Gen. David Petraeus. Clinton has said that at that time, she was using an email address she used while she was in the Senate. Months into her State Department tenure, Clinton began using an email address hosted on her private server.

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New Emails Prove Hitlery Committed Perjury… Among Other Crimes

Emails Between Hillary Clinton And Petraeus Discovered, Contradicting Her Sworn Statement – Big Government

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Who ever knows how, or if, “the law” will apply to Democrat royalty? It sure looks as if Hillary Clinton committed perjury with her sworn statement that she turned over all of the official correspondence from her secret email server, and deleted only the yoga routines, cookie recipes, wedding reception plans, and so forth.

What the Associated Press reported on Friday afternoon sounds like the “game over” moment Democrats have been fearing since the Clinton email scandal came to a boil:
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The Obama administration has discovered a chain of emails that Hillary Rodham Clinton failed to turn over when she provided what she said was the full record of work-related correspondence as secretary of state, officials said Friday, adding to the growing questions related to the Democratic presidential front-runner’s unusual usage of a private email account and server while in government.

The messages were exchanged with retired Gen. David Petraeus when he headed the military’s U.S. Central Command, responsible for running the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. They began before Clinton entered office and continued into her first days at the State Department. They largely pertained to personnel matters and don’t appear to deal with highly classified material, officials said, but their existence challenges Clinton’s claim that she has handed over the entirety of her work emails from the account.

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Hillary Clinton didn’t just “claim” she turned over all of her work-related emails. She signed a sworn statement to that effect in August, under penalty of perjury, and submitted it to a federal court. It’s the same statement her top aides Huma Abedin and Cheryl Mills refused to sign.

Many observers thought the proverbial Other Shoe would drop on Clinton when the FBI started recovering deleted emails from the server she thought was wiped clean, but it doesn’t sound like we’ve even gotten to that closet full of Other Shoes yet. The AP report says this previously undisclosed string of Clinton emails was “first discovered by the Defense Department and then passed to the State Department’s inspector general.”

State Department spokesman John Kirby said these emails were received “in the last several days” and confirmed they “were not previously in the possession of the department.” He added that the State Department has forwarded the documents to Congress.

Also, try to contain your surprise, but Clinton and her campaign have been lying about when she started using her homebrew email server. These new emails between her and Petraeus “start on Jan. 10, 2009, with Clinton using the older email account. But by Jan. 28 – a week after her swearing in – she switched to using the private email address on a homebrew server that she would rely on for the rest of her tenure. There are less than 10 emails back and forth in total, officials said, and the chain ends on Feb. 1.”

The laughable “frequently asked questions” page produced by Clinton’s campaign claims she didn’t start using the homebrew server until March 18, 2009.

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Hillary Clinton Personally Signed Off On Decision She Said She Was Not Involved In – Daily Caller

A newly uncovered document shows that Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton personally signed off on a questionable employment decision she previously claimed she was not involved with.

Top Clinton aide Huma Abedin was able to work for the Clinton Foundation, Department of State and the private consulting firm Teneo Strategies as a Special Government Employee (SGE). When questioned about the arrangement, Clinton denied any involvement, but new documents obtained by Judicial Watch show that Clinton personally signed off on the position change.

Clinton signed the document March 23, 2012 to approve the change in title, according to the documents first reported by Politico.

The employment arrangement for Clinton’s deputy chief of staff raised questions about possible conflict of interest, particularly given allegations that Clinton used her position at the State Department to help the Clinton Foundation.

On top of that, the document appears to contradict statements Clinton made earlier about the arrangement.

In an interview with Andrea Mitchell at NBC that aired earlier this month, Mitchell asked Clinton about Abedin holding jobs at the Clinton Foundation, State Department, and Teneo, a firm started by a former Bill Clinton aide.

“Well, you know, I was not directly involved in that,” Clinton answered. “But everything that [Abedin] did was approved, under the rules, as they existed, by the State Department.”

Either Clinton does not think giving personal approval via her signature was being “directly involved,” or she was dishonest with Mitchell.

Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley has been critical of Abedin’s multiple interests and the lack of transparency.

“How can the taxpayer know who exactly SGEs are working for at any given moment?” Grassley said in a statement in late August. “How can the ethics officer at the State Department know?”

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Hitlery Started Editing Emails 8 Months Earlier Than Thought

Clinton Started Editing Emails 8 Months Earlier Than Thought – Washington Examiner

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Hillary Clinton and her aides began collecting Clinton’s private emails in February of last year, eight months before the State Department formally requested copies of her work-related records.

The process of separating Clinton’s official communications from her personal ones therefore lasted nearly ten months, as her aides did not provide 55,000 printed pages of emails to the State Department until Dec. 2014.

On Feb. 15, 2014, Clinton paid Platte River Networks, the technology company hired in June 2013 to move her emails onto a new server, to set up a “separate archive email box” for her records.

Nearly two weeks later, she paid the company to shift emails from the archives onto a new system, according to Sen. Ron Johnson.

Johnson, who chairs the Senate Homeland Security Committee, wrote to Patrick Kennedy, State’s top records official, asking for documentation of the agency’s contact with Clinton aides prior to its official email request on Oct. 28, 2014.

The Wisconsin Republican suggested in his letter Tuesday that either the State Department or Clinton herself had misrepresented the nature of the agency’s initial request for Clinton’s emails.

Clinton has maintained her decision to hand over work-related emails was prompted by a routine housekeeping inquiry from the State Department, which she said had sent the same request to other secretaries of state.

However, John Kirby, State Department spokesman, told the Washington Post Tuesday the State Department only asked Clinton for her emails after discovering she never used a government account.

Officials made the discovery after unsuccessful attempts to locate Clinton’s records in response to congressional requests from the newly-formed House Select Committee on Benghazi.

Johnson cited a March statement from Clinton that implied she did not begin screening her emails until after the State Department approached her in October.

“After I left office, the State Department asked former secretaries of state for our assistance in providing copies of work-related emails from our personal accounts,” Clinton said in a press conference just days after the New York Times first broke news of her private email use.

“I responded right away and provided all my emails that could possibly be work-related, which totaled roughly 55,000 printed pages, even though I knew the State Department already had the vast majority of them,” she said.

But Johnson said new information obtained by congressional investigators cast doubt on Clinton’s account of the exchange.

“[F]rom the information obtained by the committee, it appears that Secretary Clinton’s archiving and review of her emails were in fact aspects of a multi-month-long process that began as early as eight months prior to the State Department’s formal request,” he wrote.

Johnson said the discrepancy raises questions about the “rationale for and timing of” the agency’s decision to contact Clinton for her emails.

The new information about how long Clinton’s staff spent filtering her emails appears to have come from a pair of invoices for technical services that Platte River billed to Clinton Executive Services Corporation, a private company registered in New York, state records show.

Clinton’s team downplayed reports Wednesday that Clinton and the State Department had given conflicting accounts of the agency’s email request, repeating her defense that everything she has ever done in regards to her emails was legal and similar to actions taken by her predecessors.

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Woman Chosen To Be ‘Transparency Czar’ Overseeing Hitlery’s Emails Is Actually IN The Emails

State ‘Transparency Czar’ Included In Classified Clinton Emails – Washington Examiner

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Janice Jacobs, the State Department’s new “transparency czar,” is included in some of the private Hillary Clinton emails she is meant to oversee.

Jacobs, a career diplomat who was appointed last week as the agency’s transparency coordinator, is copied on a number of now-classified emails that have been released by the State Department over the past several months.

The transparency coordinator is meant to streamline the agency’s handling of Freedom of Information Act requests and congressional inquiries for Clinton’s private emails, which have bottlenecked in the State Department’s strained records office in recent months.

But Jacobs herself is included among the records she is charged with disclosing, raising questions about her impartiality when it comes to screening her own correspondence.

For example, Jacobs is copied on an email that discussed “diplomatic activity” in North Korea. The email has since been classified.

Jacobs was included in another email discussion of North Korea that has been classified by the State Department – this one about “consular activity” in the country in April 2009.

She was also looped into an email chain involving the Haitian prime minister in February 2010, as State Department officials planned for a major donors’ conference in New York to benefit Haiti after its devastating earthquake.

The email discussed the private thoughts of Prime Minister Jean-Max Bellerive, including his opinion about how the Dominican Republic should help Haiti coordinate international donations.

Bellerive’s positions are now classified, as are parts of the email that lay out potential plans for U.S. troops to have a presence in Haiti.

Jacobs came under fire last week just hours after Secretary of State John Kerry announced her appointment, when a $2,700 donation to Clinton’s presidential campaign was discovered among Federal Election Commission records.

State Department officials dismissed the donation, arguing Jacobs’ political contributions were “not relevant” to the job.

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Clinton Crime Update: Hitlery’s Emails Contained Spy Satellite Data On North Korean Nuclear Assets

Clinton Emails Contained Spy Satellite Data On North Korean Nukes – Washington Times

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One of the most serious potential breaches of national security identified so far by the intelligence community inside Hillary Rodham Clinton’s private emails involves the relaying of classified information concerning the movement of North Korean nuclear assets, which was obtained from spy satellites.

Multiple intelligence sources who spoke to The Washington Times, solely on the condition of anonymity, said concerns about the movement of the North Korean information through Mrs. Clinton’s unsecured server are twofold.

First, spy satellite information is frequently classified at the top-secret level and handled within a special compartment called Talent-Keyhole. This means it is one of the most sensitive forms of intelligence gathered by the U.S.

Second, the North Koreans have assembled a massive cyberhacking army under an elite military spy program known as Bureau 121, which is increasingly aggressive in targeting systems for hacking, especially vulnerable private systems. The North Koreans, for instance, have been blamed by the U.S. for the hack of Sony movie studios.

Allowing sensitive U.S. intelligence about North Korea to seep into a more insecure private email server has upset the intelligence community because it threatens to expose its methods and assets for gathering intelligence on the secretive communist nation.

“While everyone talks about the U.S. being aware of the high threat of hacking and foreign spying, there was a certain nonchalance at Mrs. Clinton’s State Department in protecting sensitive data that alarms the intel community,” one source familiar with the email review told The Times. “We’re supposed to be making it harder, not easier, for our enemies to intercept us.”

State Department spokesman Mark C. Toner told The Times on Tuesday evening he couldn’t discuss the email because of ongoing probes by the FBI and the inspector general community. “There are reviews and investigations under way on these matters generally so it would not be appropriate to comment at this time,” he said.

The email in question was initially flagged by the inspector general of the intelligence community in July as potentially containing information derived from highly classified satellite and mapping system of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. That email was later confirmed to contain classified information by Freedom of Information Act officials within the intelligence community.

The revelation, still under review by the FBI and intelligence analysts, has created the most heartburn to date about a lax email system inside the State Department that allowed official business and – in at least 188 emails reviewed so far – classified secrets to flow to Mrs. Clinton via an unsecured private email server hosted at her home in Chappaqua, New York.

The email does not appear to have been copied directly from the classified email system and crossed what is known as the “air gap” to nonclassified computers, the sources said.

Rather, the intelligence community believes a State Department employee received the information through classified channels and then summarized it when that employee got to a nonclassified State Department computer. The email chain went through Mrs. Clinton’s most senior aides and eventually to Mrs. Clinton’s personal email, the sources said.

The compromised information did not include maps or images, but rather information that could have been derived only from spy satellite intelligence.

It was not marked as classified, but whoever viewed the original source reports would have readily seen the markings and it should have been recognized clearly by a trained employee who received the information subsequently as sensitive, nonpublic information. Intelligence community professionals are trained to carry forward these markings and, if needed, request that the information be sanitized before being transmitted via non-secure means.

The discovery could affect the FBI investigation of Mrs. Clinton’s email, putting the originator of the email chain into legal jeopardy and allowing agents to pressure the employee to cooperate as they try to determine how classified information flowed so freely into Mrs. Clinton’s account and what senior officials knew about the lax system that allowed such transmissions.

As the investigation has advanced, the intelligence community has debunked many of Mrs. Clinton’s and the State Department’s original claims about the private email system.

For instance, the department initially claimed that it had no idea Mrs. Clinton was conducting government business on an insecure private email account.

But the intelligence community uncovered evidence early on that her private email account was used to coordinate sensitive overseas calls through the department’s operations center, which arranges communication on weekends and after hours on weekdays.

The coordination of secure communications on an insecure break with protocol would give foreign intelligence agencies an opportunity to learn about a call early, then target and intercept the call, U.S. officials told The Times.

The concern is in full display in emails that Mrs. Clinton originated and that the department has already released under the Freedom of Information Act.

“As soon as I’m off call now. Tell ops to set it up now,” Mrs. Clinton wrote from her personal email account on Oct. 3, 2009, to top State Department aide Huma Abedin on Oct. 3, 2009, seeking the department’s operations center to set up a high-level Saturday morning call with two assistant secretaries of state and a foreign ambassador.

The email thread even indicated where Mrs. Clinton wanted to receive the call, at her home, giving a potential intercept target.

Similarly, the very next day, Mrs. Clinton and Ms. Abedin coordinated another call over insecure email with her ambassador to Afghanistan, former Army Gen. Karl Eikenberry. The two clearly understood the potential sensitive nature of the Sunday morning call even as they discussed its coordination on an unprotected email system.

“OK. Does Eikenberry need to be secure?” Mrs. Clinton asked, referring to the need for a secure phone line to receive the call. State officials said Mrs. Clinton had a secure phone line installed at her home to facilitate such calls, which is common for Cabinet-level officials.

Mr. Toner, the State Department spokesman, told the daily press briefing on Tuesday he did not know who approved Mrs. Clinton having a private email server to conduct official business but that it was obvious from the emails now released that many people knew inside State, including some in high places.

“People understood that she had a private server,” he told reporters. “…You’ve seen from the emails. You have an understanding of people who were communicating with her, at what level they were communicating at.”

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Tony Blair’s Appearance In The Clinton Emails Demolishes Hillary’s Excuses – Shannen W. Coffin

Tony Blair knew about Hillary Clinton’s private e-mail account before the American people did – and his off-the-grid e-mail exchanges with Clinton are another sledgehammer to the already crumbling edifice of excuses offered in defense of her homebrew server.

Among the thousands of Clinton e-mails released by the State Department last night were direct exchanges with foreign dignitaries such as former prime minister (and then special envoy for the Middle East Quartet) Blair and internal exchanges between State Department officials about those conversations. The conversations cover a wide range of world hot spots, including the Middle East, Afghanistan and Iran, Sudan, and Haiti. Many of them – nearly 200 in total to date – have now been classified by the State Department as “foreign government information” and redacted or withheld from release. The very nature of the communications in those e-mails established that they contained classified information from their inception. Mrs. Clinton’s defense that she did not know of the existence of such information on her server at the time is laughable.

In September 2010, Barack Obama undertook an ambitious effort to settle the ancient dispute between Israel and the Palestinian people. Direct talks took place in Washington, D.C., in early September, and follow-up discussions were planned for later in the month. But talks broke down when a moratorium on West Bank settlement construction expired and Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu sought to tie renewal of the moratorium to Palestinian recognition of Israel.

With some urgency, Hillary Clinton asked Tony Blair to cancel a speech scheduled in Aspen, Colo., to “go to Israel as part of our full court press on keeping the Middle East negotiations going.” Blair obliged, and Clinton e-mailed the organizers of the Aspen conference to explain the cancelation. She then e-mailed Blair that his schedule was now clear: “Tony – Message Delivered… I’m copying Jake Sullivan because I’ve asked him to arrange a call w you once you land so you can be fully briefed before seeing BN [Netanyahu]. We are on a fast moving train changing every hour but determined to reach our destination.”

Later that day, Blair responded: “Hi Hillary. Just spent 3 hours with BB [Netanyahu]. Ready to speak when convenient but should do it on a secure line.” There is no indication whether that secure conversation took place, but the message certainly indicates that Blair at least understood the sensitivity of the subject matter.

Blair e-mailed Clinton again the next day, copying Sullivan, Clinton’s aide, apparently on a private e-mail account of his own. The entirety of that e-mail has been redacted from public disclosure as part of the FOIA release. Why? Because it has now been acknowledged as classified information and formally marked “Confidential” by State Department reviewers. The markings that accompany the redactions (which took place just this week as part of the release) explain that the redacted portion is classified under parts 1.4(B) and 1.4(D) of President Obama’s Executive Order 13526. Thus, it falls within the categories of information classified as “foreign government information” – 1.4(B) – and information relating to “foreign relations or foreign activities of the United States, including confidential sources” – 1.4(D).

Those markings are relevant because they blow up the Clinton campaign’s insistence that Mrs. Clinton and her colleagues did not know that the information at issue was classified at the time. Clinton is, of course, correct that the e-mails were not formally marked classified at the time they were exchanged, but that is only the result of a failure by Mrs. Clinton and her staff to mark them and handle them through the proper channels used for such foreign communications. The information contained in the e-mails was plainly classified at the time they were sent and received – by order of the president.

Executive Order 13526, issued by President Obama at the beginning of his term, addresses the classification and handling of national-security information. It provides that “foreign government information” – which includes “information provided to the United States Government by a foreign government or governments, an international organization of governments, or any element thereof, with the expectation that the information, the source of the information, or both, are to be held in confidence” – must be treated as classified. The president made a determination in the Executive Order that disclosure of these confidential foreign communications “is presumed to cause damage to the national security.”

Since a reasonable expectation of harm to the national security is the threshold for whether to classify information, the president’s determination necessarily establishes the classification of any foreign communications provided to the U.S. with the expectation of confidence. The Executive Order leaves no doubt on this point, when it directs that an agency “shall safeguard foreign government information under standards that provide a degree of protection at least equivalent to that required by the government or international organization of governments that furnished the information.”

The State Department now acknowledges that the Blair communications – just like scores of other Clinton e-mails involving sensitive diplomatic communications in Africa, Afghanistan, and elsewhere – are classified “Confidential” as foreign-government communications. Their determination simply confirms that the information was classified all along and that Clinton and her inner circle should have treated the e-mails containing it with the care required by our national-security laws and regulations. Instead, they were regularly passed between insecure private e-mail addresses, handed off wholesale to the private Internet company that maintained her server, and shared with who knows how many lawyers and staff as part of her own private review process.

Putting aside the legal technicalities, Clinton’s plea of ignorance defies common sense. The very nature of our diplomatic relations requires that we closely guard information learned from foreign dignitaries. And the State Department’s secure e-mail system contains reams of such classified communications. We protect that information in order to protect our international relationships and sources. The secretary of state regularly deals in those communications, as evidenced by the growing number of e-mails now classified. Yet here we see the sitting secretary of state communicating with a foreign envoy about sensitive diplomatic communications regarding the world’s most nettlesome national-security issues. She did so on the least secure platform imaginable – a private server concealed from government oversight – and took no steps to limit the information’s subsequent distribution. Faced with such irrefutable proof of her own recklessness, the former secretary of state now claims ignorance. Her plea rings hollow.

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State Department Finds Another 150 Of Hitlery’s Emails That Contain Classified Information

Report: State Department Finds Another 150 Hillary Emails Containing Classified Info – Daily Caller

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The latest batch of Hillary Clinton emails set to be released by the State Department Monday evening include 150 which contain now-classified information, a spokesman for the agency has confirmed.

Through two mass releases so far – one in June and another last month – the State Department retroactively classified 63 emails Clinton sent or received during her tenure as secretary of state.

That’s in addition to several others which the Intelligence Community inspector general discovered contained information that was classified as “top secret” at the time they were sent.

During a daily press briefing Monday afternoon, State Department spokesman Mark Toner confirmed that approximately 150 of the 7,000 emails that will be released contain information that has been “upgraded” to classified. He said that while State Department staffers are still processing the emails before publishing them online Monday night, none of the emails are believed to contain information that was classified at the point of origination.

Toner said that the new release puts the State Department ahead of a schedule mandated by a federal judge in May.

“We’re producing more documents than we have in the previous three releases,” said Toner. U.S. district court judge Rudolph Contreras ordered the agency to release Clinton’s emails on a graduated schedule at the end of each month.

Clinton has downplayed the existence of classified information in her 30,000-plus emails. When the scandal over her use of a private email account and private server first broke in March, she maintained that none of her emails contained classified information. She has since altered that claim by saying that none of the emails that traversed her server contained information that was marked classified when originated.

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Dozens Of Emails Were ‘Born Classified,’ Undermining Hitlery’s Claim

Dozens Of Clinton Emails Were ‘Born Classified,’ Undermining Candidate’s Claim – Daily Caller

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Hillary Clinton sent and received dozens of emails that contained “foreign government information,” meaning that it was “born classified,” according to a new report from Reuters.

The finding, which Reuters based on a review of the Clinton emails that have been publicly released by the State Department, deals yet another heavy blow to the Democratic presidential candidate’s repeated claim that she did not send or receive emails with classified information when she was secretary of state.

The inspector general for the Intelligence Community has already found that two emails that traversed Clinton’s email server contained information that was “top secret” at the time it was sent. After that revelation, Clinton revised her claim, saying that she did not handle sensitive information that was marked as such when it was exchanged.

Reuters determined that at least 30 email threads from 2009 bear classification markings which indicate that the information – which is marked “confidential” – is “foreign government information.”

Clinton sent at least 17 of those emails, which are now redacted with a 1.4(b) code, the National Archives and Records Administration’s classification for foreign information, a category which includes any information written or spoken in confidence to U.S. officials by their foreign counterparts

One of those is an email Clinton sent on Nov. 10, 2009 to her longtime friend, Sidney Blumenthal. In the exchange, Clinton refers to a recent trip to Berlin.

“Lots of good exchanges w leaders,” she wrote. The rest of the email is redacted and classified as “confidential.” It was sent from Clinton’s private email account to Blumenthal’s aol.com account, which was hacked in 2013.

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Clinton’s reference to her exchanges with foreign leaders could fit into the “foreign government information” category.

The information is also classified as soon as it is generated, a former NARA official told Reuters.

“It’s born classified,” said J. William Leonard, a former director of the U.S. government’s Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO).

“If a foreign minister just told the secretary of state something in confidence, by U.S. rules that is classified at the moment it’s in U.S. channels and U.S. possession,” Leonard continued.

Reuters notes that while its findings do not undermine Clinton’s claims that the emails she sent and received did not have classification markings on them when they were received, standard nondisclosure agreements issued by the federal government warns officials that not all classified information is marked as such when exchanged.

Reuters also points to a series of presidential executive orders handed down since 2003 which have emphasized that information that foreign governments share with U.S. officials on the condition of confidentiality is the only type that is “presumed” to be classified.

That clause comes to play in a November 2009 email that a staffer for David Miliband, the British foreign secretary at the time, sent to Huma Abedin, Clinton’s deputy chief of staff.

Miliband’s aide pressed for confidentiality, writing that his boss “very much wants the Secretary (only) to see this note.”

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The rest of the email – five pages worth – is redacted. Abedin forwarded the message to Clinton’s email address, hdr22@clintonemail.com, and wrote: “Another note from milliband that he doesn’t want to send through the system.”

A spokeswoman for an unnamed foreign government included in the Clinton emails told Reuters that information was shared in confidence with Clinton and her staff.

“If so, it appears this information should have been classified at the time and not handled on a private unsecured email network, according to government regulations,” according to Reuters.

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