Tag: Ben Carson

Liberalism is an ideology of convenience

Here are two quotes which basically express the same view

First there is this one

“That’s what America is about, a land of dreams and opportunity. There were other immigrants who came here in the bottom of slave ships, worked even longer, even harder for less.”

“But they too had a dream that one day their sons, daughters, grandsons, granddaughters, great-grandsons, great-granddaughters, might pursue prosperity and happiness in this land,”

Those words are causing outrageous outrage because it is RAAAACIST! Yet this quote, from a couple of years back, is OK.

“Certainly, it wasn’t easy for those of African heritage who had not come here voluntarily and yet in their own way were immigrants themselves. There was discrimination and hardship and poverty.”

“But, like you, they no doubt found inspiration in all those who had come before them,” And they were able to muster faith that, here in America, they might build a better life and give their children something more.”

So what is the difference? Well the first quote came from Ben Carson, a Conservative, so it is out of touch, insensitive, and yes, yes, and yes again RAAAAACIST!

The second came from President Obama, so it is moving, touching, and brings perspective and healing to America or something.

See the difference there? No, well neither does any other sane person. But Liberalism is not abou sanity is it? No it is about emotion, and outrage, and being or pretending to be victimized by everything. You see when it suits a Liberal to cry racism they take comments such as Carson and go nuts. But when it suits them to use very similar comments to praise a Liberal president, well, you know Liberalism is an ideology of convenience

*VIDEO* Hillary Clinton Vs. Black Trump Supporters

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*LIVE STREAMING* Republican National Convention – 07/19/16

PRIMETIME SPEAKERS FOR TUESDAY 07/19/16:

Republican National Committee Co-Chair Sharon Day
Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchison
Former U.S. Attorney General/Former District Court Judge Michael Mukasey
U.S. Senator Ron Johnson
NRA Institute For Legislative Action Executive Director Chris Cox
U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan
New Jersey Governor Chris Christie
Donald Trump’s Daughter Tiffany Trump
Donald Trump’s Son Donald Trump, Jr.
Former Director Of Pediatric Neurosurgery At Johns Hopkins Hospital Ben Carson

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Click on the image above to watch the Republican National Convention live.

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Alternate Stream 1 – Right Side Broadcasting

Alternate Stream 2 – Breitbart

Alternate Stream 3 – Donald Trump Speeches & Events

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Phyllis Schlafly And Ben Carson Endorse Donald Trump For President

Phyllis Schlafly Stumps With Donald Trump: ‘He Is A Real Conservative And I Ask You To Support Him’ – Big Government

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Conservative leader and Founder of the Eagle Forum Phyllis Schlafly said GOP frontrunner Donald Trump is a candidate that will give conservatives “a choice not an echo” during Trump’s campaign rally in St. Louis, Missouri at the Peabody Opera House on Friday afternoon.

“I want you to meet Donald Trump,” Schlafly told the crowd full of Trump supporters. “I had the chance to meet with him a couple minutes ago and I asked him to stand by the Republican platform because we have the best conservative platform we’ve ever had. He endorsed it. He will stand by it. He is a real conservative and I ask you to support him.”

Schlafly also told the crowd that she is confident Trump will appoint conservative Supreme Court justices like Justice Scalia.

“I think he has the courage and the energy – you know you have to have energy for that job – in order to bring some changes and to do what the grassroots want him to do, because this is a grass roots uprising. We’ve been following the losers for so long.”

“This is a great, great lady,” Trump said about Schlafly after taking the stage.

Trump recalled last nights GOP primary debate in Miami, Florida, saying, “They are getting ratings on these debates.”

“I wanted to act very presidential last night,” Trump said about his performance.

He said in the past a presidential debate was a “ratings graveyard” for news networks.

“They want to do it for themselves. They don’t want to do it for us,” Trump said, adding that a network called him and said they want to have two more debates.

The real estate mogul said he wants to put the debates away but added, “I guess it’s been very helpful,” since he is leading in the polls.

Trump commented on recent incidents about protesters and violence at his campaign rallies.

He said there is “a lot of enthusiasm” at the rallies but that his supporters are “not angry people.”

“But, we do get angry when we see the stupidity with which our country is run,” he added.

“These are trouble makers,” Trump said about the protesters, several of which interrupted the rally. “They realize there are no consequences to protesting.”

“Our country has got to toughen up, folks,” he added. “These people are bringing us down.”

“There has to be some law and order,” Trump said. “The divisiveness is incredible.”

“We’re going to end it,” Trump vowed.

“I’d love to meet those people for ten minutes… what do we want? We want homes, we want education,” Trump said, adding, also wanting borders, a strong military, and jobs. “They can’t want anything more.”

Trump moved on to criticizing the Democratic Party’s frontrunner Hillary Clinton.

“Did you ever notice the way she’s so nice now? Ever notice, ‘Oh yes, the president is right about this, right about that,’” Trump mocked. “You know, she was never that way to him. She never liked him and he never liked her and then now all of a sudden everything he’s doing is fine.”

“He said things about Bill… and Bill has never forgotten it and then all of a sudden she’s saying he is the greatest thing that ever happened,” Trump said about President Obama.

“She’s becoming him,” Trump told his supporters, saying that’s how he will win. “We’re not going to let it happen.”

Trump then moved to criticizing his competitor Ohio Gov. John Kasich ahead of the Ohio primary on Tuesday.

“The governor, and I like him, but he’s in favor of the Trans Pacific Partnership, the TPP. It’s a disaster,” Trump began about Kasich.

“I am a free trader… but it’s got to be reasonable. It’s got to be fair.”

Trump then mentioned Obamacare.

“Kasich, in Ohio, brought Obamacare to Ohio. It’s a disaster,” he added saying people are very unhappy with it.

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Related article:

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Ben Carson Endorses Donald Trump – CNN

Ben Carson threw his support behind Donald Trump Friday morning, saying the two men had “buried the hatchet” and praising the Republican Party’s front-runner as a “the voice of the people to be heard.”

Speaking at a news conference here at Trump’s private club, Mar-a-Lago, the retired neurosurgeon echoed Trump’s recent calls for party unity and pleaded with the GOP to allow the “political process to play out.”

“What I’ve been seeing recently is political operatives… once again trying to assert themselves and trying to thwart the will of the people,” Carson said. “I find that to be an extraordinarily dangerous place right now.”

Carson’s endorsement, coming just one week after he ended his own White House campaign, gives Trump a significant boost as the Republican nominating contest heads to critical states like Florida and Ohio on Tuesday. Trump said he did not make any promises to Carson about a future role in a potential Trump administration, but pledged that Carson would play a “big, big part” in his campaign.

Carson – whose campaign and demeanor were polar opposites of Trump’s in many ways – played the role Friday of vouching for Trump’s character and integrity. He explained that there were “two Donald Trumps” – one that the public sees, and another more reserved and “cerebral” man who “sits there and considers things very carefully.”

“Some people have gotten the impression that Donald Trump is this person who is not malleable, who does not have the ability to listen, and to take information in and make wise decisions. And that’s not true,” Carson said. “He’s much more cerebral than that.”

Carson became the second former presidential candidate to back to Trump. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie endorsed the businessman two weeks ago.

Earlier this week, Carson had indicated that he would be open to backing either Trump or Ted Cruz. Carson and Cruz’s relationship hit a rocky patch around the first GOP primary contest in Iowa, when the Cruz campaign incorrectly told precinct captains while the caucuses were taking place that Carson may be dropping out of the race. Carson called on Cruz to take responsibility and fire whoever was responsible for the “blatant lying,” and Cruz subsequently apologized.

On Friday, Carson – a Seventh Day Adventist – insisted that he had no lingering hard feelings towards the Texas senator.

“I have completely forgiven him. That’s a duty one has as a Christian,” he said.

On the tense exchanges that he has had with Trump this cycle, Carson said all of that was also history. “We moved on because it’s not about me. It’s not about Mr. Trump. This is about America.”

Trump praised Carson throughout his press conference.

“Having (Carson’s) support, really, it just adds total credence to what I’m trying to do and to what we’re all trying to do,” Trump said, introducing Carson.

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Ben Carson Kinda, Sorta Drops Out Of Presidential Race, Saying He Sees No ‘Path Forward’ For Campaign – Will Skip Next Debate

Ben Carson Tells Supporters He Sees No ‘Path Forward’ For Presidential Campaign – Washington Post

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Ben Carson, the retired neurosurgeon who briefly led the Republican presidential race before his campaign began an extended public implosion, told his supporters in a statement Wednesday afternoon that he does not see a “path forward” and will not attend Thursday’s debate in Detroit.

Carson, however, did not formally suspend his campaign. Instead, he said in the statement that he has decided to make a speech about his political future on Friday at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Maryland, just outside Washington.

“I do not see a political path forward in light of last evening’s Super Tuesday primary results,” the statement said. “However, this grassroots movement on behalf of ‘We the People’ will continue. Along with millions of patriots who have supported my campaign for President, I remain committed to Saving America for Future Generations.”

The announcement will serve as an acknowledgment that Carson’s candidacy is all but over following a disappointing showing in the 11 states that held contests on Tuesday.

The decision follows months of candidate stumbles, staff infighting and strategy shifts derailing what had once appeared to be an unstoppable journey to conservative superstardom. It also marks the coming departure of the only high profile African American candidate in the 2016 presidential race.

Carson, 64, burst onto the political scene in early 2013 when, addressing the typically non­partisan National Prayer Breakfast, he spoke about the dangers of political correctness, put forward the idea of a flat tax and criticized President Obama’s health-care law. What stood out was that he did so right beside a steely-faced Obama.

That week, the Wall Street Journal ran an editorial titled “Ben Carson for President.” By August of that year, there was a “National Draft Ben Carson for President Committee.” Before he launched his presidential bid last May, the group had raised close to $16 million, gotten a half-million signatures encouraging Carson to run and had 30,000 active volunteers across the country, according to organizers.

The media whirlwind was hardly his first brush with fame. Before he took the conservative world by storm, Carson was famous for an up-from-his-bootstraps life story, from impoverished childhood to a high-profile neurosurgery career. He was, at 33, the youngest major division director in Johns Hopkins Hospital history, and he was the first pediatric neurosurgeon to successfully separate twins conjoined at the head. He wrote a best-selling book, “Gifted Hands,” about his life, which later became a television movie.

The same bluntness that catapulted him into contention in a year that favored plain-spoken insurgents and outsider candidates earned him criticism as well. He found himself in political hot water for calling the Affordable Care Act the “worst thing that has happened in this nation since slavery,” saying that the United States now is “very much like Nazi Germany” and predicting that allowing same-sex marriage could lead to legalized bestiality.

Even his political team admitted from the start that perhaps he needed to work on his messaging. “If I could create the Webster’s dictionary of words Dr. Carson could use in the campaign, there would be some words I’d leave out,” his former campaign chairman, Terry Giles, told The Washington Post before Carson officially jumped into the race in May. Later, when Donald Trump grabbed headlines, the usually mild-mannered Carson was urged to dial it up and take the mogul on more aggressively.

Carson resisted that advice as well. Until the end, he sought to offer himself to Republicans as a calm and steady hand, untouched by Washington.

“Many people told me that this business is corrupt, that it’s evil, that it’s how it’ll always be,” Carson said in a phone interview Monday. “But I don’t believe that we have to accept that. We should rail against that, fight against it, and get something that’s decent and inspirational.”

His performance may have played a role in his political undoing. Even as his “politically incorrect” style played well in places with staunchly conservative ­bases, his apparent unfamiliarity with many policy fundamentals, particularly on national security issues, made some voters wary.

His support dropped precipitously in the weeks after two high-profile terrorist attacks, bringing him from second place just behind Trump to fourth or fifth place in most national polls.

“Unfortunately, Paris happened. San Bernardino happened,” he told The Post earlier this year. “Somehow the narrative has been projected that if you’re soft-spoken and mild-mannered, there is no way you can deal with terrorism, with national security, that you’re not a strong person.”

It wasn’t just Carson’s often unfiltered and unseasoned approach that cost him; his advisers’ did as well, as internal feuds played out publicly, and candidate and campaign deficits were spotlighted in unusually detailed media admissions by some staffers and advisers.

Disagreements within the campaign’s highest ranks broke out into the open on numerous occasions, highlighting a persistent and sharp division between Armstrong Williams – Carson’s longtime business manager, who was not formally part of the campaign – and Barry Bennett, the Republican operative who led it.

As Carson fell from top-tier status, he publicly blamed campaign aides for his drop in the polls – calling some of them overpaid and ineffective – and vowed a staff shake-up in an interview arranged by Williams without Bennett’s knowledge. Carson backtracked hours later, but within days, several of his most experienced campaign hands, including Bennett, had resigned.

A new campaign chairman was named: retired Army Maj. Gen. Robert F. Dees – previously a Carson policy adviser who, like the candidate himself, had never before been involved in a political campaign.

The departure of a string of senior aides didn’t end the behind-the-scenes drama. Within weeks, reporters were sent a list of the only staffers they were to contact for campaign comment and for candidate interview requests – a list that pointedly did not include Williams.

The Carson campaign war chest, which had been flush with cash after solid fundraising quarters earlier in the race, began shrinking dramatically amid questions about how the money was being spent. Carson made further sweeping changes last month, cutting staff salaries and shrinking his traveling entourage.

“We had to get a much better check on the finances. I was appalled when I did a deep dive and saw what was going on. We saw that and stopped it,” Carson said in the Monday interview.

The mild-mannered candidate soon lashed out at individuals he accused of sabotaging his presidential bid, including rival Ted Cruz of Texas, whose campaign falsely circulated the idea that Carson was going to quit the race on the night of the Iowa caucuses.

He followed up a distant fourth-place showing in Iowa with last-place showings in New Hampshire and in South Carolina, a state he had once said would be a special focus. He polled poorly again in the 11 GOP primaries and caucuses Tuesday night.

When asked Monday whether he would ever reenter politics if he left the race, Carson chuckled at the prospect.

“I’m certainly not looking for something to do,” he said, adding that his plan after leaving medicine in 2013 was to retire to Palm Beach, Fla., with his wife.

“I’m not going to disappear,” he said. “But yes, if I didn’t think the country needed what we’re doing, I’d be there.”

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*VIDEOS* 2016 Conservative Review Convention: Featuring Ted Cruz, Ben Carson And Mark Levin


TED CRUZ

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BEN CARSON

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MARK LEVIN

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Audio-Mark Levin explains the Cruz/Carson non-story

Via The Right Scoop

In short much ado about nothing

Take EXTRA care in listening to the CNN audio, and HERE is the email Team Cruz sent out

CaMFponUEAAKSCy

By the way, Mark Levin has a suggestion for the crybaby Donald Trump

Oh, ok, Trump demands that Iowa nullify its election, thereby disenfranchising the record number of citizens who turned out to vote. I have another idea. Maybe we should change the primary process and just keep holding state elections until Trump wins. The truth is Trump’s personal attacks on Ben Carson did more to drive down Carson’s numbers in Iowa than anything else. But it’s nice to know Trump’s new concern for Carson’s supporters.

Boy I told you folks about Trump, over and again He is a self-promoting clown

Ted Cruz nailed Donald Trump today in a press conference where he suggested that it’s really no surprise that The Donald is having another Trumpertantrum. Cruz argued that Trump engages in insult after insult because he simply can’t debate on substance.

When asked if the insults are funny, Cruz said he wakes up each day and laughs at The Donald’s insults, which he says get more and more hysterical the more upset he gets.

“He’s losing it!”

Cruz also questioned the judgment of Trump, saying if he becomes president we might wake up one day to find out that he’s nuked Denmark!

This after Trump actually showed class and humility on Monday night in congratulating Cruz.

And, do not forget Trump absolutely trashed Carson, yet now, now he cares

I will let Ted Cruz wrap it up