Tag: 2014

German Government Report: Refugees Committed 200,000 Crimes Between 2014 And 2015

Leaked German Gov’t Report Shows Refugees Committed 200,000 Crimes Between 2014 And 2015 – Daily Caller

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A leaked report from Germany’s Federal Criminal Police Agency reveals refugees committed over 200,000 crimes between 2014 and 2015.

The report is only supposed to be seen by police and other government employees, but it ended up in the hands of Bild, a German newspaper, Deutsche Welle reports.

What the document shows primarily is that refugees are responsible for 208,344 crimes.

A total of 32 percent of those crimes were related to asset or fraud offenses, and another 33 percent were due to theft. Of the total number of crimes, only 1 percent, or 1,688, had anything to do with sexual offenses. There were 458 cases of serious sexual assault, which includes either rape or coercion.

Not all ethnic groups were equal in the amount of crimes committed. Viewed proportionally, there were more offenders from Eritrea, Nigeria and countries from the Balkans like Serbia and Albania. In absolute numbers, Syrians committed 24 percent of refugee crimes, but Serbs only comprised 2 percent of the refugee population and managed to account for an incredible 13 percent of crimes.

Bild noted, however, the report did not include the reported cases of sexual assault in Cologne on New Year’s Eve, skewing the data slightly.

The 446 alleged sexual assaults on New Year’s Eve threw Germany into an uproar, mostly because of accusations that the German government collaborated with the media to downplay the incident. Of particular note, following the assaults, Cologne Mayor Henriette Reker put the onus on females who were assault and suggested women should abide by a code of conduct to avoid future assaults.

Due to crime rates and generally undesirable behavior, tensions over importing over a million refugees were high, and the assaults in Cologne, committed mostly by Arabs and North Africans, pushed ordinary Germans over the edge. A recent poll indicated that 40 percent of Germans want Chancellor Angela Merkel to resign due to her poor handling of the refugee crisis. She has admitted Europe has totally lost control of the situation.

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Half Of The Clintons’ Charitable Giving In 2014 Went To… The Clintons

Half Of Clintons’ Charitable Giving In 2014 Went To Their Own Foundation – Washington Free Beacon

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Half of Bill and Hillary Clinton’s charitable giving last year went to the Bill, Hillary, and Chelsea Clinton Foundation, according to a review of the latest financial disclosures from their private foundation.

The Clintons earned more than $28 million in 2014 and claimed around $3 million in income as charitable tax deductions, according to tax returns released by Hillary Clinton’s campaign last Friday. The campaign emphasized Clinton’s charitable giving in a press statement, saying that it “represented 10.8 percent” of her income in 2014. But roughly half of that money – $1.8 million – appears to have been channeled to the Bill, Hillary, and Chelsea Clinton Foundation.

According to the tax returns, the Clintons gave $3 million in 2014 to the Clinton Family Foundation, a small private foundation that the family uses as a pass-through to other charities. Records show the CFF disbursed $3.7 million in 2014, including $1.8 million to the Bill, Hillary, and Chelsea Clinton Foundation.

That contribution was the family’s largest by a significant margin that year. They made numerous smaller donations to other groups, including the University of Arkansas, the American Ireland Fund, and the American Friends of the Peres Center.

The $1.8 million contribution is also by far the largest annual donation the Clintons have made to the Bill, Hillary, and Chelsea Clinton Foundation in recent years. In the past five years combined, they gave a total of $1.1 million to the organization. Their last large donation was in 2008, when they gave $1 million.

While the Clintons do not receive direct compensation from the Bill, Hillary, and Chelsea Clinton Foundation, they do benefit from travel, and many of their longtime aides have served on its payroll.

The foundation has come under fire for its unusual structure. Charity Navigator put the Clinton Foundation on its “Watch List” earlier this year because it said the organization did not meet its criteria due to its “atypical business model.”

The group is also under review from the Better Business Bureau, after failing to meet its transparency standards in the past.

Clinton’s newly released tax returns, which show that she and her husband have earned $140 million since 2007 could bolster Republican efforts to frame the former secretary of state as a wealthy elitist who is out of touch with average Americans. Vox reported Monday that Clinton has paid more in taxes since 2007 – $57.5 million – than GOP presidential candidate Jeb Bush has earned in his entire career spanning back to 1981.

The returns have also opened her up to charges of hypocrisy from critics.

Americans for Tax Reform slammed Clinton on Tuesday for forming an “Article 4 trust,” which the group said appears to be a method to avoid paying estate taxes—a tax Clinton has supported.

“Clinton has consistently voted for the Death Tax throughout her time in public office and forcefully condemned attempts to lower it,” ATF said in a statement. “But when it comes to her own finances, it is a different story. The newly released tax returns buttress earlier reports outlining the ways Clinton uses financial planning strategies that shield her Death Tax liability.”

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Leftist Nightmare Update: 22 Of 23 Taxpayer-Funded Obamacare Co-Ops Lost Money In 2014

22 Of 23 Taxpayer-Backed Obamacare Co-Ops Lost Money In 2014, Audit Finds – Daily Signal

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A new report from a government watchdog examining the success of taxpayer-funded Obamacare co-ops found that the vast majority lost money last year and struggled to enroll consumers, throwing their ability to repay the taxpayer-funded loans into question.

According to the audit from the Department of Health and Human Services’ inspector general, 22 of the 23 co-ops created under the Affordable Care Act experienced net losses through the end of 2014. Additionally, 13 of the 23 nonprofit insurers enrolled significantly less people than projected.

Co-ops, or consumer-oriented and operated plans, are nonprofit insurance companies created under Obamacare. Co-ops exist in a variety of capacities, and lawmakers hoped the entities would foster competition in areas where few insurance options were available.

The co-ops received $2 billion in loans from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to assist in their launch and solvency. However, the government watchdog warned that repayment may not be possible.

“The low enrollment and net losses might limit the ability of some co-ops to repay startup and solvency loans and to remain viable and sustainable,” the report said.

Andy Slavitt, head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, attributed the co-ops’ financial losses to the difficulties of moving into a new market.

“The co-ops enter the health insurance market with a number of challenges, [from] building a provider network to pricing premiums that will sustain the business for the long term,” he said. “As with any new set of business ventures, it is expected that some co-ops will be more successful than others.”

Roughly half of the nonprofit co-ops struggled to enroll consumers, and the vast majority experienced significant losses in 2014.

According to the Department of Health and Human Services’ inspector general report, Arizona’s co-op, Meritus Health Partners, saw the lowest enrollment when compared with its projections. Through the end of 2014, the insurer enrolled just 869 Arizona consumers, compared with its projected enrollment of 23,998.

By contrast, New York far surpassed its enrollment projections. As of Dec. 31, Health Republic Insurance of New York signed up 155,402 people. It expected to enroll 30,864.

Additionally, 22 of the 23 co-ops experienced net losses as of Dec. 31, with the exception of Maine Community Health Options, which was profitable.

Just two insurance companies, including the co-op, offered plans on the federal exchange in Maine. Maine Community Health Options offered the lowest-priced coverage and enrolled 80 percent of marketplace consumers in the state, according to the inspector general.

In South Carolina, Consumers’ Choice Health Insurance Company exceeded profitability projections as of the end of 2014. However, the co-op still incurred net losses of $3.8 million. It expected a net income loss of $8.1 million.

Information regarding income for the co-op serving Iowa and Nebraska, CoOportunity, was not available, as the insurer was liquidated in March. CoOportunity received $145.3 million from the federal government in startup and solvency loans.

The report from the Department of Health and Human Services watchdog came after Louisiana’s co-op, Louisiana Health Cooperative, Inc., announced last week it would be discontinuing operations at the end of the year. The nonprofit insurer projected to enroll 28,106 Louisiana consumers in 2014 but signed up just 9,980 through the federal marketplace.

Additionally, Louisiana Health Cooperative incurred $20.6 million in net losses as of Dec. 31.

Similarly, Tennessee’s co-op, Community Health Alliance Mutual Insurance Company, froze enrollment during Obamacare’s second open enrollment period, which began in October. The co-op cited its financial conditions as a reason for its enrollment freeze.

According to the inspector general’s report, the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services placed four co-ops on “enhanced oversight and corrective action plans.” Two were put on notice for low enrollment.

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Thanks Barack… Federal Regulation Cost American Businesses And Consumers $1.88 Trillion In 2014

Report: Cost Of Federal Regulation Reached $1.88 Trillion In 2014 – Washington Free Beacon

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The cost of federal regulation neared $2 trillion in 2014, according to a new report by the Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI).

Ten Thousand Commandments: An Annual Snapshot of the Federal Regulatory State, a report by Clyde Wayne Crews, CEI’s vice president for policy, also reveals that the U.S. debt now exceeds the size of China’s economy.

“Federal regulation and intervention cost American consumers and businesses an estimated $1.88 trillion in 2014 in lost economic productivity and higher prices,” amounting to roughly $15,000 per household, the report said.

The report found that the federal bureaucracy – made up of 60 agencies, departments, and commissions – has 3,415 regulations in the process of being finalized, meaning that the number of regulations far surpasses the number of laws passed by Congress.

“In 2014, agencies issued 16 new regulations for every law – that’s 3,554 new regulations compared to 224 new laws,” the report said.

CEI, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, found that the Departments of the Treasury, Commerce, Interior, Health and Human Services (HHS), Transportation (DOT), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) account for 48 percent of all federal regulations.

The EPA issued 539 final rules in the Federal Register last year, up 12.5 percent in five years.

Enforcing regulations alone cost the government $59.5 billion in 2014.

Government regulation has led to a hidden “tax” for Americans, the report said, as businesses pass along compliance costs to consumers.

“Economy-wide regulatory costs amount to an average of $14,976 per household – around 29 percent of an average family budget of $51,100,” the report said. “Although not paid directly by individuals, this ‘cost’ of regulation exceeds the amount an average family spends on health care, food and transportation.”

Aside from passing costs onto consumers, the report said, regulation is a way for the federal government to further agendas without relying on the legislative system.

“Rather than pay directly and book expenses for new initiatives, federal regulations can compel the private sector, as well as state and local governments, to bear the costs of federal initiatives,” the report said.

Regulations hit small businesses the hardest, averaging $11,724 per employee for firms that employ fewer than 50 people in 2012. The overall cost per employee for all companies comes to $9,991.

The cost of regulation has grown so large, according to the report, that if it was a country “it would be the world’s 10th largest economy, ranking behind Russia and ahead of India.”

The regulatory state has been growing for decades. The report notes that 90,836 rules have been issued since 1993.

The Federal Register, the government’s official record for all federal regulations, was
77,687 pages long at the end of 2014, the sixth-highest page count in history.

“Among the six all-time-high Federal Register page counts, five have occurred under President Obama,” CEI said.

The report also noted that the national debt, which currently stands at $18.152 trillion, is now larger than China’s economy. China surpassed the U.S. to become the largest economy in the world last December.

“The national debt topped $18 trillion in December 2014,
the same month the International Monetary Fund calculated China’s economy to
be worth $17.6 trillion in terms of purchasing power parity, making it the world’s largest economy (albeit still significantly lagging the United States on a per capita basis),” CEI said.

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*VIDEO* Ben Shapiro: Obama’s Broken Promises, 2014


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2014 Federal Register: A 26-Foot-Tall Stack Of Neo-Fascist Regulations

The 2014 Federal Register Is A 26-Foot-Tall Stack Of Regulatory Overreach And Growing – Independent Journal Review

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You do want a joyous, prosperous, and fully-federally compliant 2015, right? Well, we’ve got good news and bad news for you. And we have the Competitive Enterprise Institute to thanks for the heads up.

The good news: The government puts together an annual Federal Register of all the rules and regulations that are currently in force.

The bad news: It’s 78,978 pages long.

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On a positive note, this year’s register is a mere pamphlet when compared to the behemoths of 2010 and 2011.

So what exactly is it? From the intro page:

The FEDERAL REGISTER provides a uniform system for making available to the public regulations and legal notices issued by Federal agencies. These include Presidential proclamations and Executive Orders, Federal agency documents having general applicability and legal effect, documents required to be published by act of Congress, and other Federal agency documents of public interest.

There are 3,591 new rules and regulations contained therein. 2014 brought us new regulatory rules and clarification on existing rules in almost every area of business, both small and large:

The Agriculture Department saw 1,095 documents published with rules and regulations applied or clarified on everything from outreach to crop insurance to food stamps and meat inspection.

The Commerce Department weighs in with a whopping 2,694 new documents, the majority of which deal with international trade rules.

The Energy Department begins 2015 with 2,203 new documents. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has a lot to study this year.

Unsurprisingly, Obamacare implementation means that the Heath and Human Services Department tops the list with 3,714 new documents containing regulation, rules, and clarifications on rules and regulations.

These rules and others make for some heavy reading material. For perspective, 78,978 pages is 158 reams of paper. A ream is about 2″ thick, that means the entire register would yield a 26-foot-tall stack of standard letter paper.

And it doesn’t look like this administration plans to slow down its rule making in 2015. There are 2,375 more proposed rules that are pending but have yet to receive final Congressional approval.

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Your Daley Gator Global Warming Update: SNOWMAGEDDON 2014! (Pictures/Video)

Rockin’ In The Frozen World: Snowed-In Rock Band Trapped On Their Tour Bus For Two Days And A Woman Forced To Give Birth In A Firehouse As Buffalo Braces For Another Three Feet – Daily Mail

An expectant mother was forced to give birth in a firehouse after being unable to reach hospital due to nearly six feet of snow falling in just 36 hours in New York.

The Buffalo area has been battered by storms in recent days, which has left some motorists, including the rock band Interpol, trapped on western New York highways, with the National Guard bracing itself for another three feet of snow.

But just as the snow began accumulating around her home on Tuesday evening, Bethany Hojnacki went into labor.

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Buried: Homes are covered in snow in West Seneca, New York Wednesday after the Buffalo area found itself buried under as much as six feet of snow Wednesday, with another lake-effect storm expected to bring 2 to 3 more feet by late Thursday

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Will Sunday’s game be postponed? Ralph Wilson Stadium in Orchard Park, N.Y. – the home of the Buffalo Bills is buried in snow, Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014. The Buffalo area found itself buried under as much as 5 feet of snow Wednesday, with another lake-effect storm expected to bring 2 to 3 more feet by late Thursday

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Joyful: Bethany Hojnacki and her husband Jared were trapped in their south Buffalo home Tuesday night as Bethany went into labor. hours later, Lucy Grace Hojnacki was born (pictured) was born in an area firehouse

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Her husband Jared decided to flag down firefighters as they helped a driver stuck in the monumental snowstorm near their south Buffalo home, Buffalo News reports.

After some failed attempts- with the help of neighbors -to dig out their street, the Hojnackis were forced to find a quicker solution.

With the help of a stranded driver who also happened to be a pediatric nurse, WVIB reports that Bethany gave birth to a healthy baby girl in a nearby firehouse.

Lucy Grace Hojnacki was born weighing 6 pounds and 2 ounces. She has a big brother in Jared and Bethany’s 19-month-old son.

Meanwhile, rock band Interpol were among the 100 motorists stranded on a highway outside Buffalo, when their route to Montreal, where they were due to play a show, became completely blocked.

‘Settling in for another night. Haven’t moved all day. Hoping the expected storm tonight ain’t as bad as predicted. C’mon now now,’ tweeted guitarist Daniel Kessler around 7pm Wednesday.

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Stranded (with booze): The rock band Interpol (band mates at left) were on their way to play a show in Montreal on Tuesday when their tour bus (at right) became trapped along with 100 or so other motorists on Buffalo-area highways paralyzed by historic snowfall

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The group kept their spirits up by tweeting from inside their tour bus. Photos showed band members posing with vodka and snacks as well as the completely glazed windows of their bus-turned-chilly prison.

‘Keeping the spirits in a good place ya’ll. thanks for the well wishes. It means a lot to us. Big ups to you,’ Kessler wrote to fans.

And the wintry hell isn’t over.

As of Wednesday night, an additional 2 to 3 feet possible into Thursday, putting the one-week totals for the Buffalo area at close to the average snowfall for a year: 93.6 inches, or nearly to 8 feet.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has called up the National Guard to help rescue up to 100 stranded drivers who spent more than a day and a half stranded on highways after six feet of snow overwhelmed western New York this week.

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Doritomageddon? This Doritos truck was apparently abandoned in the snow of South Buffalo by its driver in Tuesday’s snowstorm

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Out of supplies? Social media evidence suggests the Doritos truck has been raided by hungry Buffalo residents

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New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s entourage makes its way on interstate I-190 to survey an area in West Seneca, New York November 19, 2014. Cuomo and other government officials viewed part of the thruway where several trucks and motorists were stranded after an autumn blizzard dumped a year’s worth of snow on western New York state

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Shaking hands: New York Governor Andrew Cuomo talks with a stranded trucker on interstate I-190 while surveying an area in West Seneca, New York

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Keep on truckin’: Trucks lined Memorial Drive waiting to dump snow on the grounds of the Central Terminal, Wednesday in Buffalo, N.Y. Snow was being trucked out of the hardest hit areas after yesterday’s snowstorm which dropped more than five feet of snow

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Still more: A bulldozer clears the way for an ambulance in a neighborhood in West Seneca on Wednesday as the Buffalo area braced for another battering of lake effect snow into Thursday

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Big dig: A man digs out his driveway in Depew, New York. Authorities are bracing for up to three more feet that could fall on western New York before the storm subsides this weekend

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Pile-up on the road: Cars are stranded on Mile Strip Road at the entrance to Route 219 near Buffalo, New York on Wednesday after almost 24 hours of huge snow falls

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No delivery: Trucks are parked at Jim’s Truck Stop in Cheektowaga, outside Buffalo, New York on Wednesday after the truckers were left with no choice but to hold-fast at the parking lot

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Cars are covered in snow in Orchard Park, New York, with another lake-effect storm expected to bring 2 to 3 more feet by late Thursday

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Heave ho: A 132-mile stretch of the New York State Thruway remained closed Wednesday and dozens of drivers were trapped on the road after their vehicles became overwhelmed by the snow. Other motors abandoned their vehicles or were rescued by state troopers

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Authorities are bracing for up to three more feet that could fall on western New York before the storm subsides this weekend.

A 132-mile stretch of the New York State Thruway remains closed today and dozens of drivers were trapped on the road after their vehicles became overwhelmed by the snow. Other motors abandoned their vehicles or were rescued by state troopers.

Currently, 22 stranded motorists are camping out at the Lackawanna toll station on the Thruway, waiting for vehicles to get through so that they can return home, the Buffalo News reports. Their cars are still parked on the highway – and in the way of snow plows that are attempting to clear the road.

Endjie Ulysses, a student at Penn State University, told NBC News she was one of 14 people trapped on a Greyhound bus on the Throughway for 34 hours before state troopers rescued them on Wednesday.

‘I’m just tired. I’ve only slept for about two or three hours,’ she said.

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Ominous: Storm clouds and snow blows across Lake Erie in Buffalo, New York, November 18, 2014. An autumn blizzard dumped a year’s worth of snow in three days on Western New York state, where seven people died and residents, some stranded overnight in cars, braced for another pummeling expected later on Wednesday

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Built for this weather: A buffalo at the Buffalo Zoo sports a frozen beard on November 19, 2014 in Buffalo, New York. A brutal storm has dumped more than FIVE FEET of snow in Buffalo, New York

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To the rescue: Servicemen from the New York Air National Guard helped dig out stranded motorists and others who were trapped by six feet of snow that fell in Buffalo, New York, between Monday night and Wednesday

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Guardsmen also shoveled off the roof of a nursing home that was in danger of collapsing from the weight of the snow

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Stranded: These are just a few of the at least 100 cars and trucks that are left stranded on the New York State Thruway after it was socked in by several feet of snow

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Hunkering down: Charles Miller reclines in the cab of his big rig, where he has been stuck for more than 36 hours after getting caught in a snow storm on Tuesday

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The snow is so heavy that it has to be loaded into trucks and carried away in many places because there’s no room to plow it on the roadsides

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The snow is so heavy that it risks caving in roofs and must be shoveled away to reduce the weight

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Students from the Grand Valley State University built a snowman that looks like the character Olaf from the movie ‘Frozen’ in Michigan

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Up to three feet more snow is headed to Buffalo, New York, on Wednesday night and Thursday

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The early winter storms and bitter temperatures have already been blamed for at least eight deaths across three states – including a man in Buffalo, New York, who was found dead in his car, covered in several feet of snow after he crashed into a ditch.

The rest of the country was forced to bundle up again today as temperatures continue to clock in at 15 to 20 degrees below average for this time of year.

It was even colder today in many parts of the country than it was on terrible Tuesday. This means lows of 20 degrees in New York, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. and single digits across most of the Midwest – including nine degrees in Chicago.

Even the South is experiencing a record-breaking deep-freeze, with temperatures dropping to 31 in Houston, 30 in New Orleans, 28 degrees in the Florida panhandle and 21 in Atlanta.

The bitter cold snap will continue for the rest of the week, with lows in the teens in the Midwest, 20s in the Northeast and mid-30s in the South for Thursday and Friday.

The storm stranded about 150 people in their cars on the New York State Thruway for hours Tuesday night and Wednesday – including the Niagara University women’s basketball team.

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Snow smash: The incredible snowfall – five feet in just a matter of hours – caved in roofs and even smashed through the doors of this Buffalo, New York, home

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Lake effect: The view from the sky above Buffalo, New York, shows the lake effect snow storm moving into the city from Lake Erie. Lake effect snow has caused nearly all of the snowfall in the last two days – mostly in Upstate New York and western Michigan

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A band of storm clouds moves across Lake Erie and into Buffalo, New York on Tuesday. Parts of New York measured the season’s first big snowfall in feet, rather than inches, as three feet of lake-effect snow blanketed the Buffalo area and forced the closure of a 132-mile stretch of the state Thruway

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Cold enough: Wednesday has proved even colder than terrible Tuesday – with lows of 20 degrees in New York City and Washington, D.C., and single digits across the Midwest. Pictured here, a house in Buffalo, New York, where temperatures dipped to 13

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Stranded: The Niargara University wpmen’s basketball team was stranded on the New York State Thruway in western New York for 26 hours until they could be rescued. About 150 motorists spent the night in their cars

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Frozen: Air travel was also hit by delays thanks to the snow – above is a Delta Airlines plan at Buffalo Greater International Airport

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Team spokeswoman Chelsea Andorka said the bus, with about 25 players and coaches aboard, was headed back from a loss in Pittsburgh when it came to a halt at 2am on Tuesday.

‘We were told the National Guard was coming by but haven’t seen any signs of life,’ Andorka said.

‘The first time they came they told us to be prepared to stay for a while. One tow truck passed six or seven hours ago.

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Even colder: Temperatures dropped even lower today than they were yesterday in much of the country – with lows in the single digits in most of the Midwest and low 20s in the South and Northeast

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No relief: It will warm slightly on Thursday – though temperatures will still be far below average for mid-November – teens in the Midwest, 20s and 30s in the Northeast and mid-30s in the South

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Warmer weekends: Friday will still be cold and miserable for most of the country, but Sunday and Monday are expected to see average – or even above average – temperatures return

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More snow: Up to 18 inches of additional snow could hit western New York today, adding to the six feet that’s already on the ground in the region

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‘It seemed like a nightmare. It just didn’t feel like it was going to end,’ Bryce Foreback, 23, of Shicora, Pennsylvania, told The Associated Press by cellphone 20 hours into his wait for help. ‘I haven’t slept in like 30 hours and I’m just waiting to get out of here.’

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo deployed 150 members of the National Guard to help clear the cars from the road during a brief lull between storms. A state of emergency, declared on Tuesday, remains in effect for parts of the region and officials are telling people to stay inside and off the roads.

By Wednesday, 100 cars remained on the New York State Thruway. A 132-mile stretch of the vital highway remains closed because snowplows cannot clear the road due to the stuck cars.

Authorities are hoping to clear them by later today.

Amtrak has also suspended train service to and from western New York as crews work to clear tracks of the heavy pileup.

Airports in Buffalo and Grand Rapids, Michigan, were forced to cancel flights as a result of the snow.

Authorities say there is so much accumulation that it can’t just be plowed in most places – it must be scooped up and hauled away in order to clear roads.

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Surf Buffalo: One daredevil couple laughed in the face of Jack Frost and went surfing in the sub-freezing temperatures on Lake Erie

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Cold snap: The massive cold caused a watermain break in Dayton, Ohio. The water leak waked out the road, causing a massive sinkhole that nearly swallowed a truck

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Isn’t that dangerous: This man didn’t quite finish digging out his truck before taking to the roads in Lancaster, New York

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Nobody dreams of a white November: It seems this resident of Buffalo gave up after trying to shovel out of their home

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Parking lot: Over 100 cars are still stranded on the New York State Thruway, preventing plows from clearing it. A 132-mile stretch of the vital highway remains closed

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Coming through: Freight trains are plowing their way through western New York, though Amtrak has suspended passenger rail service to the region

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Digging out: A man in Buffalo labors to shovel out his driveway in the wake of the snowstorm. Several people have died of heart attacks while shoveling

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Stuck: Cars are snowed under across the country, leaving drivers with hours of work if they want to leave

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Daunting task: Many residents of Lancaster, New York, haven’t even begun to clear their driveways

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The storms in Michigan and Upstate New York are the result of lake effect snow. Lake effect snow is the result of cold winds blasting across the relatively surfaces of the Great Lakes, which tend to retain heat, picking up moisture as they go.

When that cold, moist air makes landfall, it can result in sudden, massive snow storms. The squalls can be surprisingly isolated. Some part of Buffalo got nearly five feet of snow on Tuesday. Others escaped with just a few inches.

In a region accustomed to highway-choking snowstorms, this one is being called one of the worst in memory.

Snow blown by strong winds forced the closing of a 132-mile stretch of the Thruway, the main highway across New York state.

Meteorologists say temperatures in all 50 states fell to freezing or below on Tuesday. They say the low temperatures were more reminiscent of January than November.

In New Hampshire and elsewhere, icy roads led to accidents. Lake-effect storms in Michigan produced gale-force winds and as much as 18 inches of snow, and canceled several flights at the Grand Rapids airport.

Schools closed in the North Carolina mountains amid blustery winds and ice-coated roads. In Indiana, three firefighters were hurt when a semitrailer hit a fire truck on a snowy highway.

In Atlanta, tourists Morten and Annette Larsen from Copenhagen were caught off-guard by the 30-degree weather as they took photos of a monument to the 1996 summer Olympics at Centennial Olympic Park.

‘It’s as cold here as it is in Denmark right now. We didn’t expect that,’ Larsen said, waving a hand over his denim jacket, buttoned tightly over a hooded sweatshirt.

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Neighbors pulled out their tractors on Wednesday to help dig out from the heavy snow fall, which topped 60 inches in some places

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Put the kids to work: Braeden Attig, 11, has been given the daunting task of digging out his mother’s car in Orchard Park, New York

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Several feet of snow made a clearing driveways a tough task, even with a snow blower

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Cabin fever? This gentleman appeared to be enjoying the snow a bit too much

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The outside coming in: Chrissy Gritzke Hazard, of Cheektowaga, New York, snapped these pictures after the incredible snow that piled up smashed through her doors and into her house

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No walkies! A dog in Buffalo, New York, is left stuck inside after a storm dumped several feet of snow on Tuesday

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No way out: This New York resident showed how snow blocked off the entrance to her garage – blocking her from leaving her house to get fuel

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Piling up: Art Hauret, of Lancaster, New York, needed a tape measure to show off the four feet of snow that piled up in his driveway in just a few hours on Tuesday

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Making the best of it: Some western New York residents, hardened by life in the Great White North, used the massive snow as an excuse to have a little fun

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In Buffalo, Brian Krzeminski watched the snow pile up outside the south Buffalo convenience store where he worked overnight and served free coffee to the motorists and pedestrians who came in off the city streets to get out of the blinding snow.

‘There are people that came out to get a few things. We had some people who came in just to get a 30-pack of beer, which is kind of odd,’ he said. ‘We’ve had EMTs whose ambulance got stuck. I’m constantly seeing cars get stuck.’

The National Weather Service warned that the snow, generated by cold air blowing over the warmer Great Lakes, would continue through Wednesday and could eventually total 6 feet in places. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo deployed 150 member of the National Guard to help clear snow-clogged roads and remove abandoned vehicles.

‘We have tried to get out of our house and we are lucky to be able to shovel so we can open the door. Basically, that’s it, open the door,’ said Linda Oakley of Buffalo. ‘We’re just thinking that in case of an emergency we can at least get out the door. We can’t go any further.’

‘All around us, it’s a solid 4 feet of snow that is so thick and so heavy you can hardly move it with a shovel,’ said Oakley, whose son Todd was with her, unable to make it to work just three miles away.

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Too cold: By Thursday, temperatures will still be far below normal for this time of year – up to 19 degrees lower than average in some places

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More than half of the country is currently covered in snow and more is expected to fall on Wednesday

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Buried: Upstate New York residents are digging out today and bracing for up to 18 inches of additional snowfall

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Fun in the snow: Kids of all ages found themselves playing in the snow on Tuesday – one of the upsides of the dramatic blizzard

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Jim Lehmann was hunkering down with his wife in their town of Hamburg home, while outside his neighbor’s house was barely visible through the blowing snow.

‘The main thing to do now is sit in the house and wait it out,’ Lehmann said. ‘My neighbor works for a satellite dish company and he tried to get out this morning and he got stuck 80 feet down the street. And he was there for three hours.’

The town of West Seneca recorded 45 inches by late morning and Alden, to the east, had 48 inches. But typical of lake-effect snow, areas just a few miles away, including downtown and north Buffalo, had just a couple of inches.

At one point, nearly half of West Seneca’s plows were bogged down in heavy snow, officials told The Buffalo News. In neighboring Orchard Park, the highway superintendent called the rate of snowfall ‘unbelievable,’ while next door in Hamburg police cars were getting stuck.

Oakley and her son, Todd, were passing the time watching ‘Dumb and Dumber’ on Netflix.

‘We can’t even walk down to the end of the street and get ourselves a pizza,’ she said, laughing. ‘Maybe if you had snow shoes, I don’t know.’

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*VIDEO* Bill Whittle: Speech At 2014 AFP Dallas Summit


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CBO “Revises” Its 2014 GDP Forecast, Hilarity Ensues (As Always) – Tyler Durden

CBO “Revises” Its 2014 GDP Forecast, Hilarity Ensues (As Always) – Tyler Durden

The gross, in fact epic, incompetence of the Congressional Budget Office when it comes to doing its only job, forecasting the future state of the US economy, has previously been extensively documented here (and here and here and here). This incompetence is in the spotlight once again this morning with the CBO’s release of its latest forecast revision of its original February 2014 projection.

And while every aspect of the revised projection has changed, in an adverse direction of course, the punchline is the chart below: the CBO’s revised projection for 2014 GDP. It’s one of those “no comment necessary” visuals.

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Surprising? Hardly. After all the CBO is swarming with indoctrinated Keynesian cultists whose only achievement in life is to be wrong about everything (and then to blame the Fed for not “easing enough”). Here is how the CBO “explains” this 50%+ cut in its forecast in just 6 months:

CBO has lowered its projection of real growth of GDP in 2014 from 3.1 percent to 1.5 percent, reflecting the surprising economic weakness in the first half of the year.

Which as other Keynesian talking heads have already made quite clear was due to snow. That’s right: over $100 billion in forecast economic growth “evaporated” from the US economy because it… snowed.

The good news? The CBO refuses to forecast the “harsh weather” for the foreseeable future, and has kept all of its 2015 and onward GDP estimates as is. So when things go horribly wrong to the CBO’s forecast, which is 100% guaranteed to happen, the CBO can again blame “surprising economic weakness” because, well, everyone else is doing it.

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Those who wish to waste their time can find the source here.

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*VIDEOS* 2014 Republican Leadership Conference Featuring Sarah Palin, Newt Gingrich, Phil Robertson, And Ted Cruz


SARAH PALIN

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PHIL ROBERTSON

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RICK PERRY

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HERMAN CAIN

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NEWT GINGRICH

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TED CRUZ

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Click HERE to visit the official website of the 2014 Republican Leadership Conference

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Rush Limbaugh Wins 2014 Children’s Choice “Author Of The Year” Award

Rush Limbaugh Is Now A Best Selling, Award Winning Children’s Book Author – Yahoo News

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It looks like Rush Limbaugh can add the title of award winning children’s book author to his vast resume. He has become “Author of the Year” as the result of winning the 2014 Children’s and Teen Choice Book contest.

To be sure Limbaugh likely won because the award is given out as the result of voting by actual child and teen readers and not some panel of academics and/or journalists. The fact that he has a popular radio show and might have mentioned the fact that he was a contestant once or twice likely entered into it as well.

Limbaugh won the award as the result of his book “Rush Revere and the Brave Pilgrims” which is an account of how a time traveling middle school teacher, who bears an uncanny resemblance to the radio talker, and a talking horse visit the original Plymouth colony in the 1600s. The New York Times best-selling book was followed up by “Rush Revere and the First Patriots” which had his doppelganger visiting the outbreak of the American Revolution.

When the news had been released that Limbaugh was up for the award, the left let loose a hue and cry and tried to have him removed from the list. Fortunately this campaign was to no avail, as it was pointed out that the award was not subject to outside pressure but rather to the desires of young readers.

Besides writing entertaining stories and adding to his vast fortune as a result, Limbaugh’s motive for the books is to expose American children to a more positive view of American history. Sad to say that in too many schools, the United States is not depicted as a great country any longer as education has been replaced by political indoctrination. Limbaugh is trying to rectify that, which must be as bitter gall and wormwood to the left as well.

Click HERE For Rest Of Story

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*VIDEO* Pittsburgh Steelers 2014 Draft Class


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Ryan Shazier – LB – Height: 6’1″ – Weight: 237 – Grade: A-

Stephon Tuitt – DE – Height: 6’7″ – Weight: 313 – Grade: A

Dri Archer – WR, RB, KR – Height: 5’8″ – Weight: 173 – Grade: A+

Martavis Bryant – WR – Height: 6’5″ – Weight: 211 – Grade: A-

Shaquille Richardson – CB – Height: 6’0″ – Weight: 194 – Grade: B

Wesley Johnson – OT – Height: 6’5″ – Weight: 297 – Grade: A-

Jordan Zumwalt – LB – Height: 6’4″ – Weight: 235 – Grade: B-

Daniel McCullers – DT – Height: 6’7″ – Weight: 352 – Grade: A

Rob Blanchflower – TE – Height: 6’4″ – Weight: 256 – Grade: C+

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2014 NFL Draft Picks – Rounds 4 Through 7

Note: for the following 4 rounds, I have only posted the draft picks of last season’s 4 best teams, which were the Patriots, the 49ers, the Broncos and the Seahawks. Oh, and I’m also including the Steelers’ picks, because PITTSBURGH RULES!

Click HERE for all other draft results from rounds 4, 5, 6 and 7.

Patriots – Stork, Bryan – C – 6’4″ – 315 lbs – Florida State – 5.1

49ers – Ellington, Bruce – WR – 5’9″ – 197 lbs – South Carolina – 5.3

Seahawks – Marsh, Cassius – DE – 6’4″ – 252 lbs – UCLA – 5.2

Steelers – Bryant, Martavis – WR – 6’4″ – 211 lbs – Clemson – 5.3

Seahawks – Norwood, Kevin – WR – 6’2″ – 198 lbs – Alabama – 5.3

49ers – Johnson, Dontae – CB – 6’2″ – 200 lbs – N.C. State – 5.3

Patriots – White, James – RB – 5’9″ – 204 lbs – Wisconsin – 5.1

Seahawks – Pierre-Louis, Kevin – OLB – 6’0″ – 232 lbs – Boston College – 5.1

Patriots – Fleming, Cameron – OT – 6’5″ – 323 lbs – Stanford – 5.3

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49ers – Lynch, Aaron – DE – 6’5″ – 249 lbs – South Florida – 5.1

Broncos – Barrow, Lamin – OLB – 6’1″ – 237 lbs – LSU – 5.3

Steelers – Richardson, Shaquille – CB – 6’0″ – 194 lbs – Arizona – 5.1

49ers – Reaser, Keith – CB – 5’10” – 189 lbs – Florida Atlantic – 5.1

Seahawks – Staten, Jimmy – DT – 6’4″ – 304 lbs – Middle Tennessee State – NR

Steelers – Johnson, Wesley – OT – 6’5″ – 297 lbs – Vanderbilt – 5.3

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Patriots – Halapio, Jon – OG – 6’3″ – 323 lbs – Florida – 5.0

49ers – Acker, Kenneth – CB – 6’0″ – 190 lbs – SMU – 5.0

Steelers – Zumwalt, Jordan – ILB – 6’4″ – 235 lbs – UCLA – 5.2

Patriots – Moore, Zach – DE – 6’5″ – 269 lbs – Concordia – 5.2

Seahawks – Scott, Garrett – OT – 6’5″ – 294 lbs – Marshall – NR

Patriots – Thomas, Jemea – CB – 5’9″ – 192 lbs – Georgia Tech – 5.1

Broncos – Paradis, Matthew – C – 6’3″ – 306 lbs – Boise State – 5.0

Seahawks – Pinkins, Eric – FS – 6’3″ – 220 lbs – San Diego State – 4.9

Steelers – McCullers, Daniel – DT – 6’7″ – 352 lbs – Tennessee – 5.6

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Seahawks – Small, Kiero – RB – 5’8″ – 244 lbs – Arkansas – NR

Steelers – Blanchflower, Rob – TE – 6’4″ – 256 lbs – Massachusetts – 5.0

Broncos – Nelson, Corey – OLB – 6’0″ – 231 lbs – Oklahoma – NR

49ers – Ramsey, Kaleb – DE – 6’3″ – 293 lbs – Boston College – 5.0

Patriots – Gallon, Jeremy – WR – 5’7″ – 185 lbs – Michigan – 5.2

49ers – Millard, Trey – FB – 6’2″ – 247 lbs – Oklahoma – 5.1

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Click HERE to view results of ROUND 1.

Click HERE to view results of ROUNDS 2 & 3.

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2014 NFL Draft Picks – Rounds 2 & 3 (Videos)

Texans – Su’a-Filo, Xavier – OG – 6’4″ – 307 lbs – UCLA – 5.9
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Cowboys – Lawrence, Demarcus – DE – 6’3″ – 251 lbs – Boise State – 6.0
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Browns – Bitonio, Joel – OT – 6’4″ – 302 lbs – Nevada – 5.8
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Raiders – Carr, Derek – QB – 6’2″ – 214 lbs – Fresno State – 6.1
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Falcons – Hageman, Ra’Shede – DT – 6’6″ – 310 lbs – Minnesota – 6.0
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Buccaneers – Seferian-Jenkins, Austin – TE – 6’5″ – 262 lbs – Washington – 5.4
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Jaguars – Lee, Marqise – WR – 6’0″ – 192 lbs – USC – 6.2
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Lions – Van Noy, Kyle – OLB – 6’3″ – 243 lbs – BYU – 5.4
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Rams – Joyner, Lamarcus – CB – 5’8″ – 184 lbs – Florida State – 5.2
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Eagles – Matthews, Jordan – WR – 6’3″ – 212 lbs – Vanderbilt – 5.7
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Giants – Richburg, Weston – C – 6’3″ – 298 lbs – Colorado State – 5.3
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Bills – Kouandjio, Cyrus – OT – 6’7″ – 322 lbs – Alabama – 5.8
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Seahawks – Richardson, Paul – WR – 6’0″ – 175 lbs – Colorado – 5.2
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Steelers – Tuitt, Stephon – DE – 6’5″ – 304 lbs – Notre Dame – 6.1
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Redskins – Murphy, Trent – OLB – 6’5″ – 250 lbs – Stanford – 5.6
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Ravens – Jernigan, Timmy – NT – 6’2″ – 299 lbs – Florida State – 5.8
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Jets – Amaro, Jace – TE – 6’5″ – 265 lbs – Texas Tech – 5.5
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Chargers – Attaochu, Jeremiah – OLB – 6’3″ – 252 lbs – Georgia Tech – 5.8
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Bears – Ferguson, Ego – DT – 6’3″ – 315 lbs – LSU – 5.4
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Cardinals – Niklas, Troy – TE – 6’6″ – 270 lbs – Notre Dame – 5.6
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Packers – Adams, Davante – WR – 6’1″ – 212 lbs – Fresno State – 5.7
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Titans – Sankey, Bishop – RB – 5’9″ – 209 lbs – Washington – 5.6
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Bengals – Hill, Jeremy – RB – 6’1″ – 233 lbs – LSU – 5.5
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Broncos – Latimer, Cody – WR – 6’2″ – 215 lbs – Indiana – 5.2
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49ers – Hyde, Carlos – RB – 6’0″ – 230 lbs – Ohio State – 6.1
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Saints – Jean-Baptiste, Stanley – CB – 6’3″ – 218 lbs – Nebraska – 5.3
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Colts – Mewhort, Jack – OT – 6’6″ – 309 lbs – Ohio State – 5.6
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Panthers – Ealy, Kony – DE – 6’4″ – 273 lbs – Missouri – 5.8
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Jaguars – Robinson, Allen – WR – 6’2″ – 220 lbs – Penn State – 5.6
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Patriots – Garoppolo, Jimmy – QB – 6’2″ – 226 lbs – Eastern Illinois – 5.8
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Dolphins – Landry, Jarvis – WR – 5’11” – 205 lbs – LSU – 5.6
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Seahawks – Britt, Justin – OT – 6’6″ – 325 lbs – Missouri – 5.1
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Texans – Fiedorowicz, C.J. – TE – 6’5″ – 265 lbs – Iowa – 5.4

Redskins – Moses, Morgan – OT – 6’6″ – 314 lbs – Virginia – 5.4

Dolphins – Turner, Billy – OT – 6’5″ – 315 lbs – North Dakota State – 5.3

Falcons – Southward, Dezmen – FS – 6’0″ – 211 lbs – Wisconsin – 5.3

Buccaneers – Sims, Charles – RB – 6’0″ – 214 lbs – West Virginia – 5.3

49ers – Martin, Marcus – C – 6’3″ – 320 lbs – USC – 5.6

Browns – Kirksey, Christian – OLB – 6’2″ – 233 lbs – Iowa – 5.2

Vikings – Crichton, Scott – DE – 6’3″ – 273 lbs – Oregon State – 5.5

Bills – Brown, Preston – ILB – 6’1″ – 251 lbs – Louisville – 5.3

Giants – Bromley, Jay – DT – 6’3″ – 306 lbs – Syracuse – 5.3

Rams – Mason, Tre – RB – 5’8″ – 207 lbs – Auburn – 5.8

Lions – Swanson, Travis – C – 6’5″ – 312 lbs – Arkansas – 5.5

49ers – Borland, Chris – ILB – 5’11” – 248 lbs – Wisconsin – 5.3

Redskins – Long, Spencer – OG – 6’5″ – 320 lbs – Nebraska – 5.2

Ravens – Brooks, Terrence – FS – 5’11” – 198 lbs – Florida State – 5.3

Jets – McDougle, Dexter – CB – 5’10” – 196 lbs – Maryland – 5.1

Raiders – Jackson, Gabe – OG – 6’3″ – 336 lbs – Mississippi State – 5.7

Bears – Sutton, Will – DT – 6’0″ – 303 lbs – Arizona State – 5.2

Texans – Nix, Louis – NT – 6’2″ – 331 lbs – Nptre Dame – 5.9

Cardinals – Martin, Kareem – DE – 6’6″ – 272 lbs – North Carolina – 5.6

Packers – Thornton, Khyri – DT – 6’3″ – 304 lbs – Southern Miss – 5.1

Eagles – Huff, Josh – WR – 5’11” – 206 lbs – Oregon – 5.2

Chiefs – Gaines, Phillip – CB – 6’0″ – 193 lbs – Rice – 5.2

Bengals – Clarke, Will – DE – 6’6″ – 271 lbs – West Virginia – 5.1

Chargers – Watt, Chris – OG – 6’3″ – 310 lbs – Notre Dame – 5.4

Colts – Moncrief, Donte – WR – 6’2″ – 221 lbs – Mississippi – 5.9

Cardinals – Brown, John – WR – 5’10” – 179 lbs – Pittsburgh State – 5.1

Panthers – Turner, Trai – OG – 6’3″ – 310 lbs – LSU – 5.5

Jaguars – Linder, Brandon – OG – 6’6″ – 311 lbs – Miami – 5.2

Browns – West, Terrance – RB – 5’9″ – 225 lbs – Towson – 5.3

Broncos – Schofield, Michael – OT – 6’6″ – 301 lbs – Michigan – 5.2

Vikings – McKinnon, Jerick – RB – 5’9″ – 209 lbs – Georgia Southern – 5.4

Steelers – Archer, Dri – RB – 5’8″ – 173 lbs – Kent State – 5.5

Packers – Rodgers, Richard – TE – 6’4″ – 257 lbs – California – 5.2

Ravens – Gillmore, Crockett – TE – 6’6″ – 260 lbs – Colorado State – 5.1

49ers – Thomas, Brandon – OT – 6’3″ – 317 lbs – Clemson – 5.4

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Click HERE to view results of ROUND 1.

Click HERE to view results of ROUNDS 4 THROUGH 7.

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2014 NFL Draft Picks – Round 1 (Videos)

Texans – Clowney, Jadeveon – DE – 6’6″ – 266 lbs – South Carolina – 7.5
Video
Chris Burke’s analysis:
Strengths: An imposing figure, with strength and size to match his speed. Because of that combination, Clowney can keep tackles and tight ends guessing as to how he will attack. When he gets a step around the edge, even the most agile blockers will find it difficult to recover before he disrupts the pocket. When opponents are in solid position, Clowney can extend his arms, drive his legs and power his way where he wants to go. As the blow-up of Vincent Smith proved, Clowney will lower the boom if he gets the chance – that goes for unaware quarterbacks as well as running backs.
Though dropping him in at a DE spot and leaving him alone might be tempting, Clowney did perform well from various positions up front. He definitely has the strength to drop down inside on pass-rushing downs for a team with multiple outside threats. Much like J.J. Watt, Clowney has the awareness and the length to disrupt aerial attacks even when he cannot break through the line.
Has the athleticism to chase down plays from the backside. Also will be better dropping in coverage than most people expect, should he be tasked with that challenge.
Weaknesses: The concerns regarding his motor and conditioning are overblown, but Clowney can run on fumes at times, which was especially noticeable early in the season versus up-tempo offenses. Rather than come off the field when he was fatigued, Clowney appeared to ease up – thus making himself an easy blocking assignment.
Linebacker skills will need work. Right now, he could handle the most basic of those duties but could be exposed if he somehow winds up in space against a RB or TE. Not going to make many plays on the ball if he’s not at the line (though, the same could be said for most DE-types).
Mentally, can he handle the expectations?
Grade: A

Rams – Robinson, Greg – OT – 6’5″ – 332 lbs – Auburn – 7.4
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Doug Farrar’s analysis:
Regardless of position, there is no better run-blocker in this draft class than Robinson – he uses a devastating combination of size and leverage to maul the defenders he’s blocking over and over. When he gets under the pads of the man he’s blocking off the line, it’s not pretty for that poor opponent, because at his best, Robinson can make those one-on-ones look positively comical. When he pushes defenders back, he keeps his hands inside the pads and blows the opponent off to one side, leaving huge lanes. And even when he doesn’t use optimal leverage, he’s strong enough to get away with it – he won’t frequently lose traction based on poor technique.
Didn’t get a lot of tight end help to his side in Auburn’s offense, and he doesn’t need it — especially in the run game. Moves his feet well from gap to gap — though he’s not incredibly fast in a straight line, Robinson is impressively agile in the box. Has the will to assert physical authority over his opponents – he’s not a gentle giant, and any team looking for an ass-kicking offensive lineman should start right here. Will occasionally use a club move as a defensive lineman would to move through lines; Robinson plays very aggressively.
Weaknesses: Where Robinson falls short at this point is in any blocking scheme that requires to do more than fire straight out – in delayed blocking, he struggles to keep his feet under him and can be beaten by quickness and agility. He will occasionally lunge at ends who are looking to cover or move around him, and his hit percentage in those instances is not exceptional. Has the speed to get to the second level quickly but tends to mince his steps at times, and he takes a while to zero in on his target. Basically, in open-field situations, he’s very much a work in progress.
In pass protection, he has a decent straight-back kick step, but he could stand to be quicker with it, and he’s not exceptionally quick to adjust from side to side against edge rushers. And he won’t be able to get away with as many technique flaws in the NFL – at the pro level, you can’t always just bull your way around mechanical issues. Not especially adept with combo blocks and certain zone principles – tends to stay in his lane.
Grade: A+

Jaguars – Bortles, Blake – QB – 6’5″ – 232 lbs – Central Florida – 6.2
Video
Chris Burke’s analysis:
Strengths: Almost every pro-Bortles argument you hear will start with his size. Even though the Seahawks just won a Super Bowl with the comparatively diminutive Russell Wilson running the show, many teams still want QBs who fit Bortles’ 6-5, 232-pound build. He takes advantage of that height, keeping his eyes downfield and using a steady release to avoid having passes swatted at the line. Bortles also moves better than one might expect, both inside and outside the pocket.
Touch is there, especially in intermediate windows and to the sideline. Bortles really has no issues stepping up and resetting to throw, or sliding to his left or right and throwing with zip. Intangibles all are there, at least if his interviews and comments by his former teammates/coaches are to be believed – all of the latter speak glowingly of Bortles. He was not rattled by any situation, from road games at Ohio State and Penn State to the BCS bowl stage against Baylor.
Weaknesses: Decision-making needs to improve, as his INT numbers (16 total over the past two years) easily could have been higher. Sometimes drifts into a gunslinger-style approach, attempting to thread the needle, and he does not necessarily possess the arm strength to pull off all of those gambles. Can float some deep balls, too, a problem most noticeable when a pass rush rattles him. UCF’s offense will slow his adjustment to the NFL; it did not require him to make a ton of progression reads.
O’Leary’s comments about Bortles as a pro QB will be taken with a grain of salt, but we cannot dismiss completely Bortles’ college coach doubting his abilities to start as a rookie: remember, O’Brien (whose team has the No. 1 pick) has worked with O’Leary, so he is likely to pick the UCF coach’s brain.
Grade: B-

Bills – Watkins, Sammy – WR – 6’1″ – 211 lbs – Clemson – 7.3
Video
Doug Farrar’s analysis:
Strengths: One of the things that makes Watkins so captivating as a player is that he is a legit weapon to make a big play from anywhere – from the backfield to the slot to any position in trips or bunch formations. Tremendous after-catch player on bubble screens, and he’s very dangerous on end-arounds. As a backfield weapon, he looks and thinks like a running back with his foot-fakes and acceleration. Has the pure speed and second gear to outrun college cornerbacks to the end zone, but will also gain separation with an estimable array of jukes off the line and in space. Tremendously effective in motion plays, especially out of the backfield – this is how he often creates separation – and his understanding of formation spacing and timing serves him well. He’s very tough to cover when he’s hitting the line with a full head of steam, and his NFL team would do well to use him in these types of “waggle” plays. Blocks with above-average effort and form, though not a lot of power.
Weaknesses: Watkins’ height creates concerns with regards to jump balls and contested catches; he’s simply not big enough to grab some of the balls that more physically imposing receivers might. And while he’s strong, he needs space to operate – he’ll get taken down on first contact a lot if the first contact is a form tackle attempt, though he’ll drive his helmet in and try to gain extra yardage. Watkins said at the combine that he’s comfortable with all manner of route concepts, but he was a quick up-and-out and vertical target at Clemson, and there are times when he appears a step slow on some more angular routes – especially curls and comebacks or anything with really quick cuts. Has the physical talent to master the techniques required and shows it at times, but that could be a process.
To his credit, Watkins addressed specific route issues from the podium at the scouting combine.
“I’ve become a pretty good route runner, but there are areas I can still improve in with getting out of my routes,” he said. “What I’m really focused on is my curl routes and my comebacks. I’ve got to get my transitions, and know when to run full speed or not, and sync my hips and get out of my routes.”
Grade: B-

Raiders – Mack, Khalil – OLB – 6’3″ – 251 lbs – Buffalo – 7.2
Video
Chris Burke’s analysis:
Strengths: A 3-4 OLB spot might be ideal, but Mack’s versatility makes him a fit for any scheme – he mentioned at the combine that he had been telling NFL coaches he could play with his hand in the dirt as a 4-3 end if they wanted. Creates constant problems for offensive linemen because of the variety of ways he can get to the quarterback. Speed’s (4.65) a real selling point, but Mack also plays with strong hands at the line, enabling him to get through blocks.
Rarely, if ever, pancaked or driven into the second level. Not a defender who can be chop-blocked either, due to steady balance. Mack does not mind creating contact at the point of attack, an approach that he brings over to an aggressive tackling style.
His three interceptions last season point to competency in pass coverage. Especially when the play develops in front of him – screens, short passes to tight ends, check-downs – Mack reacts rapidly and closes on the football. Confidence is there to succeed, as is that chip-on-the-shoulder intangible that teams will not fail to notice.
Weaknesses: Will need to improve his coverage techniques; even with his speed, he will be a little touch-and-go early when it comes to covering NFL tight ends and RBs. Players like Mack from mid-major schools always will have to answer for the competition level they faced, and Mack had two of his least productive games against Baylor and in that bowl loss to San Diego State.
If Mack is going to play along the line, either as a DE or stand-up rush linebacker, he has to get quicker jumps off the snap. Everything he does when pass-rushing can take a little longer than it needs to, either because of slow reaction time off the snap or because he allows himself to be pushed too wide by a blocker.
Grade: A

Falcons – Matthews, Jake – OT – 6’5″ – 308 lbs – Texas A&M – 7.2
Video
Doug Farrar’s analysis:
Strengths: Matthews is the most technically sound and polished offensive lineman in this draft class, and that shows up on tape in all kinds of ways. As a pass-blocker, he is fluid and consistent in his kick-slide, and he establishes a solid arc of protection back to the pocket with his footwork and low base. Gets his hands inside a defender’s pads and generally keeps them there — he’s very tenacious. As a run-blocker, he excels not with tremendous root strength, but with an understanding of angles and leverage that makes him appear functionally stronger than he really is. Does outstanding work in slide protection because he’s so good at keeping his feet active but efficient – there aren’t a lot of wasted steps for Matthews, and he doesn’t usually have to recover from his own mistakes. Understands and does well in zone concepts like combos and pass-offs – he keeps his eyes forward and his hands moving, and when he has to jump quickly to handle a second defender, he has no problem with that. Gets out of his stance in a hurry off the snap and moves to block, meaning that he gains the advantage of striking the first blow most of the time.
Matthews is a very quick and agile player, and I think this is an underrated aspect of his game – he has the ability to execute tackle pulls to any gap, and all the way across the line, and he’s great when asked to head to linebacker depth and pop a defensive target in space. Matthews would be an especially great pick for any team with a mobile quarterback, because blocking for Manziel trained him to maintain his protection as long as the play is alive.
Weaknesses: Matthews isn’t a dominant physical athlete – he’s not going to physically overwhelm opponents with brute power, and he has to stay straight with his technique as a result. Occasionally gets too high in his stance, and can be moved back and aside as a result. And if he doesn’t get his hands out first, he’s not prone to re-directing after he’s beaten, meaning he’ll lose battles with more aggressive defenders. This is a core strength issue, and something that his NFL team will want him to correct.
Grade: A

Buccaneers – Evans, Mike – WR – 6’5″ – 231 lbs – Texas A&M – 6.4
Video
Chris Burke’s analysis:
Strengths: Perhaps Evans’ greatest strength is his ability to get free in short spaces on a number of routes – he doesn’t just win vertical battles; he’s also very good at quick cuts for his size (6-foot-5, 231). And with his length, he’s able to expand his catch radius to bring in balls most receivers simply can’t. Catches with his hands – Evans doesn’t wait for the ball to hit him in the chest, which allows him to reach for catches when falling away. He’s also surprisingly fast on straight vertical routes – Evans gets a head of steam going quickly and has a clear extra gear in the open field. He’s not a big, lumbering player; he has outstanding stride length and he knows how to use it. Evans will be a great help to any mobile quarterback, because he’s learned from playing with Manziel that you always have to keep focused on the extended play. When Manziel was running around, Evans was moving with him and getting opening with his physicality.
Excellent blocker who gets his long arms extended and seems to enjoy mixing it up. In that same vein, he’s very comfortable breaking tackles and throwing stiff-arms. Tremendous threat on in-breaking routes (in-cuts, slants, posts) because it’s so hard to keep up with his speed and still deal with his height. Could be a dominant situational slot receiver; more NFL teams are taking their No. 1 targets and looking to create mismatches in this way.
Weaknesses: Focus is an issue at times – Evans drops balls he should catch, and he had to be talked back into the Chick-fil-A Bowl by Manziel after a couple of personal fouls. And like most bigger college receivers, Evans will need to expand his route tree in the NFL. His game, like Manziel’s, was based a great deal on improvisation, and his pro team might not like that prototype. Played against a lot of off-coverage designed to react to his quarterback; Evans will need to develop his foot fakes and hand moves against more aggressive press corners in the NFL.
Grade: A-

Browns – Gilbert, Justin – CB – 6’0″ – 202 lbs – Oklahoma State – 6.3
Video
Doug Farrar’s analysis:
Strengths: Gilbert’s raw speed allows him to cover a ton of ground, plus helps him recover from any mistakes he may make. As he stated at the combine, with the ball in his hands he’s a constant threat to go the distance, be it off an interception or on a kick return. Receivers almost never blow past him on straight-line routes, further evidence that he’s as fast as the 40 time made him look.
Height and leaping ability make Gilbert a menace in the air – the pick-six he pulled off versus Texas came after he planted, then leaped toward the sideline in front of a receiver. Takes advantage of his size when playing in press coverage (though, not always effectively, as we’ll touch on shortly). Tough to beat over the middle because because how well he can get his foot into the ground, then transfer to top speed.
His ability to step in as a return man will earn him extra points. Barring an injury, the worst-case scenario for Gilbert heading into camp is that he competes for a No. 2 or No. 3 cornerback job while contributing heavily on special teams. He is very smooth with the ball in his hands, and made catches on interceptions that some receivers might have struggled to make.
Weaknesses: As with another projected Round 1 cornerback, Darqueze Dennard, Gilbert almost invites officials to flag him with his contact in coverage. Dennard can get himself into trouble attempting to maintain a jam; Gilbert has more issues downfield, where he’ll lunge and put himself in tough positions on deep balls. Some of that could be rectified if Gilbert continues to improve reading plays – right now, he can hang himself out to dry on well-run routes because he’s constantly hunting for an interception.
Effective as a tackler, but not overly eager to get involved, especially in the run game. Considering how physical he can be in man-coverage, it would be nice to see him translate that edge over to tracking ballcarriers. As with a quarterback who tries to overcompensate for poor reads with a strong arm, Gilbert puts almost too much faith in his speed, which may not fly quite as comfortably in the NFL.
Grade: B

Vikings – Barr, Anthony – LB – 6’5″ – 255 lbs – UCLA – 6.5
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Chris Burke’s analysis:
Strengths: Spectacularly quick off the edge, and flashes the ability to bend well when trying to turn the corner around blockers. Puts his speed to use once he works free of blockers, closing on QBs in a hurry. Chases the ball well – 83 tackles in 2012 and 66 in ’13, many coming with Barr pursuing to the far side of the field. Deceptive strength both as a tackler and in fighting off blocks.
Barr’s willingness to shift from running back to receiver to H-back and finally to linebacker highlights his coachability, a factor NFL teams pay very close attention to during the draft process. Barr also speaks honestly about the areas in which he needs to improve.
Coveted size for an edge player. Once he develops a little better feel for his timing, Barr will be difficult to throw passes over or around because of his length. Some room to add bulk, though he said at the combine that he feels most comfortable at his current weight.
Weaknesses: Must become far better utilizing his hands to shed blockers, as he can be dominated at times right now. Along the same lines, Barr has to improve his repertoire when rushing the passer, because a straight speed rush will be less effective in the NFL than it was at UCLA.
By his own admission, Barr’s coverage skills leave something to be desired. UCLA did not ask him to drop with much regularity, but it will be a key component of his game from here out, especially if he lands as a LB in a 4-3 scheme. He also misses more tackles than he should while gunning for the big hit. Barr will run himself out of position against play-action and misdirection, an element of his game that NFL offenses will exploit until he hones his awareness.
Grade: B+

Lions – Ebron, Eric – TE – 6’4″ – 250 lbs – North Carolina – 6.2
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Doug Farrar’s analysis:
Strengths: Speed really sets him apart as compared to other tight ends in the 2014 class. Can turn upfield after short-to-intermediate routes but is most dangerous darting into the seam. Even talented slot corners and adept safeties will find it tough to turn and run with him; linebackers can be left in his wake. Improving blocker with a decent amount of experience playing in-line. Better suited to get out into the slot and create mismatches. Can be far more of a red-zone threat than he was in college. Confidence bordering on cockiness, a positive when he can reel it in.
Weaknesses: Dropped nearly 12 percent of the passes thrown his way, an unexpectedly high number that means he’ll leave folks frustrated from time to time. By his own admission, must improve as a run blocker, especially if the team that drafts him wants to use him as a No. 1 tight end. Should be better than he is making grabs in traffic, which could help explain to some extent his very low TD total. Will he be OK with playing a complementary role?
Grade: B

Titans – Lewan, Taylor – OT – 6’7″ – 309 lbs – Michigan – 6.3
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Chris Burke’s analysis:
Strengths: Moves extremely well for a man of his size. Lewan drops very well to protect the passer, while his quick feet could make him a fit in either a man- or zone-blocking scheme. Clears to the second level in a hurry, picking out and hunting down linebackers to block. Plays through the whistle with venom – nearly faced discipline for a series of scraps, including Lewan twisting an opponent’s helmet during a game versus Michigan State. Recovers well when he’s jolted by a push to his chest. Vocal and outspoken leader of the Wolverines offense for multiple seasons.
Weaknesses: Penalized too much… and, honestly, easily could have been flagged for about two or three more holding penalties per game. Can be caught leaning and off-balance, most noticeable when Lewan is trying to push forward late in plays; occasionally shows up when a speed rusher gets a step on him. Carrying some red flags he no doubt has had to answer for during meetings with teams. Lets emotion get the best of him, sacrificing his technique to look for a big hit. Blitzes can cause him problems.
Grade: B

Giants – Beckham, Odell – WR – 5’11” – 198 lbs – LSU – 6.1
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Doug Farrar’s analysis:
Strengths: Beckham can excel either outside or in the slot, and his primary attribute is his pure game-breaking speed. In the slot, he drives off the snap with quickness from the first step and can simply outrun safeties to his assigned area. Forces defenses to assign a deep defender and can take the top off a coverage. On the outside, Beckham moves smoothly downfield on routes to the sideline and the numbers, and he exhibits terrific change-of-direction skills. In addition, Beckham has an innate understanding of route concepts that will help him greatly at the NFL level – he has outstanding body control, looks the ball into his hands, gets open in small spaces and is elusive enough to juke defenders who try to grab him after the catch. And if he gets past those defenders, it’s off to the races again.
Kills defenses with comebacks and curls. Can take quick slants and bubble screens upfield in a hurry – he’ll be a great yards-after-catch asset at the next level. Dynamic return man who will change direction and doesn’t need much of an opening to make a big play or take it to the house.
Weaknesses: Beckham’s only real limitations are related to his size – he won’t win a lot of jump-ball battles, he’s not a physical blocker, and though he’s tough in traffic, it’s possible that he’ll be limited by bigger and more physical cornerbacks at the NFL level. Though he’s improved a great deal in his command of the little things, he will occasionally regress and miss a ball he should have caught. However, this isn’t the issue it used to be, and Beckham’s clear tendency to work hard and improve will serve him well when coverages get more complex.
Grade: A

Rams – Donald, Aaron – DT – 6’1″ – 285 lbs – Pittsburgh – 6.3
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Chris Burke’s analysis:
Strengths: Not only experienced at lining up in multiple spots, but productive everywhere. Donald brings a smart, varied rush to the table, which allows him to work with effectiveness from the one-tech spot on out. Most of his victories up front come as result of an explosive first step off the snap. The quickness he flashed for a national audience at the combine was no fluke. Donald also can win with power, if he cannot break through immediately. In that regard, his stature actually can play to his advantage – being a little lower to the ground allows him to get his hands into a blocker’s chest naturally, allowing him to push opponents back.
True to the praise for his work ethic, Donald can stay on the field as a three-down player and rarely downshifts in intensity. He’ll chase the ball whistle to whistle, sideline to sideline, showing enough recognition to keep locked on the right target despite misdirection.
Weaknesses: Can be neutralized when he does not get the first step, with his size occasionally proving problematic against strong guards. Though he more than held his own as a nose tackle at Pittsburgh, his lack of girth makes it difficult to project him there in the pros, potentially limiting his role. Only average arm length plus 6-1 height means that he will not swat many passes at the line if he fails to get home on a rush. May have a tough time if asked to anchor versus the run as a two-gap player.
Grade: A-

Bears – Fuller, Kyle – CB – 6’0″ – 190 lbs – Virginia Tech – 5.9
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Chris Burke’s analysis:
Strengths: Fuller is really good with his feet – he can stick with a receiver through any stutter or foot fake, and he transitions fluidly to coverage. Backpedals well and turns his hips in time to stay on his target. Fuller plays off-coverage like a pro and understands pattern reading, which makes him great outside or in the slot. He might be the best at his position in this draft class when it comes to closing on routes and following through to break up the play. Fuller is fast anyway (ran a 4.49-40 at the combine), but his awareness of technique and his quick closes on angles make him look even quicker on the field. Not a dominant tackler per se, but will sell himself out to stop a play and excels at inline and slot blitzes.
Plays well in the slot and has the size (6-0, 198) to deal with bigger receivers and some tight ends. Extends to inside position and can trail receivers in the slot and outside. Gets vertical very well and knows how to time his jumps. Recovery speed isn’t Olympian, but it’s good enough. Played linebacker depth against Georgia Tech in 2013 and split through different gaps with pass and run blitzes.
Weaknesses: Due to the aggressive nature of his play, Fuller will occasionally bite on play-fakes, play-action and double moves, but this isn’t a major problem. And he addressed the injury concerns with his combine performance.
Grade: A-

Steelers – Shazier, Ryan – OLB – 6’1″ – 237 lbs – Ohio State – 6.3
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Chris Burke’s analysis:
Strengths: From the line back to linebacker depth and from any gap, Shazier has tremendous closing speed, and he’s very aggressive when looking to stop run plays. He moves through trash very deftly and uses an understanding of angles and tackling technique to stay with backs. Generally patient at the line before he moves to tackle; seems to have a really good sense of play recognition and he tends to overrun plays more than he’s fooled. More impressive is Shazier’s range in coverage; he’s a legitimate asset when dealing with backs, slot receivers and tight ends and can get this done from inside or outside positions. Shazier has the speed to chase from sideline to sideline, and he spies quarterbacks well while reading for possible throws. Tremendous vision and redirection ability allows him to peel off from coverage to tackle at the second and third levels. High-quality blitzer as long as he has space to move – if put on the edge in passing situations he could reward the Steelers with a 10-sack season. By all accounts, a high-quality player and person who will lead and help greatly with defensive calls.
Weaknesses: Shazier’s size shows up as a negative when he gets blocked out pretty consistently in power situations, especially when offensive linemen are plastering him inside or outside on run plays. While he plays inside more than credibly, Pittsburgh may want to keep him outside to allow him to make more plays in space – he’s not a pure “thumper” in the traditional vein. Wraps up well at times, but relies on the potential kill shot too often and misses opportunities to stop plays as a result. Will lose play discipline at times and get misdirected.
Grade: B+

Cowboys – Martin, Zack – OT – 6’4″ – 308 lbs – Notre Dame – 6.2
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Doug Farrar’s analysis:
Strengths: Outstanding drive blocker who rises up from a three-point stance quickly, gets his hands inside the defender and uses leverage to push people back. Excellent upper-body strength, which he uses to get his hands forward and in a striking position to keep opponents on their side of the line. Finished his blocks by lifting defenders off their own power. Understands combo blocks and can peel off his first defender to help with a second defender seamlessly and with no trouble. Keeps a low center of gravity and places his feet properly to give himself a wide base. Good speed to the second level when asked to block in space, and Martin has an excellent sense for his targets – if he whiffs, it’s generally more about lack of speed than any awareness issues.
Weaknesses: In pass pro, Martin’s kick slide is a work in progress – he’s more choppy than smooth with his steps. Establishes protection against turning pass-rushers more with technique than fluidity, and can be susceptible to defenders who change directions quickly. Needs an extra split second to come out of his stance to the outside, and you’ll occasionally see speed rushers blow right by him. In a general sense, better when blocking people in front of him than to either side – plays best in the proverbial phone booth. Hasn’t pulled a lot, which he’ll have to do if he switches to guard in the NFL, but seems to have the skills to do so.
Grade: B

Ravens – Mosley, C.J. – LB – 6’2″ – 234 lbs – Alabama – 6.4
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Chris Burke’s analysis:
Strengths: Earned those lofty tackle numbers by showing an exceptional ability to find and chase the football. Moves well sideline to sideline, diagnosing plays quickly while avoiding blockers. Rarely misses a tackle; form is very solid there, with Mosley seldom lunging unless it’s a last-ditch effort. Can take on playcalling/audible responsibilities if the team drafting him so desires – displays great awareness and football intelligence.
Fluid enough to drop into coverage, particularly in a zone look or when tracking a RB out of the backfield. Should be able to move around in a defensive alignment if need be, making him a reliable three-down option. Very few mysteries in Mosley’s game as he heads to the next level.
Weaknesses: If Ravens fans are expecting a pass-rushing linebacker, they’ll have to lower their exectation as Mosley failed to record even a half-sack last season and does not really have those attributes in his arsenal, save for an occasional blitz. Needs to add some bulk – or at least functional strength – if he’s going to play in the middle of an NFL defense. Right now, he has a hard time shedding blockers if he fails to find a free release toward the football.
Better against the run than against the pass; he’ll need to show the ability to cover more ground than he currently does in coverage. Mosley also should be better than he is at getting in front of passes, given his quickness. Size (6-foot-2, 234 pounds) probably will be an issue if he finds himself matched up against tight ends. It may be problematic on the whole, too, if Mosley continues to get banged up as he did at Alabama.
And on those injuries… they’re a clear potential headache. A team will draft Mosley to lock down a starting LB spot from Day 1 through Week 17. Is he physically capable of handling that responsibility?
Grade: A-

Jets – Prior, Calvin – S – 6’2″ – 207 lbs – Louisville – 6.3
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Doug Farrar’s analysis:
Strengths: Pryor has tremendous field speed, and he’s able to use it to great effect in all areas of his game. There are times when you simply wonder how he got from here to there so quickly. When he breaks out of coverage to run support, he flies to the ball and is a willing and violent tackler. Sifts through trash pretty well and doesn’t give up on plays – even if he misses the tackle the first time around, he’s a good bet to help pick it up later. Understands angles and leverage as a tackler. When he is asked to cover half-field, he does so with ease – his sideline-to-sideline speed is as good as anyone’s in this draft class at any position. Will move seamlessly from the line to linebacker depth to the back half, which allows him to keep his eyes on his assignments and avoid over-correcting. For such a fast player, Pryor doesn’t get fooled often.
In coverage, Pryor can mirror everything from short angle routes to comebacks to deep vertical concepts, and he has an excellent sense of when to break for the ball. Plays slot receivers very well because of his tenaciousness and agility, and he can break outside to cornerback positioning in a pinch. Has the vertical length and timing to stick with receivers bigger than him, even on jump balls. Sneaks in and breaks on routes as you would expect a better cornerback to do. Legitimate center-field defender on deep posts and other vertical concepts. Comes off the line like a scalded dog on blitzes and can bring a lot of pressure when put in that position. Gives full effort on every play – you just don’t see dropoffs on his tape.
Weaknesses: There are times when Pryor’s size works against him – he will get blocked out of plays, and as aggressive as he is, he may want to peel back a bit and understand that he’ll make even more plays if he avoids contact at times as opposed to putting himself in disadvantageous situations. And he’ll have to watch his physical style of tackling when he hits the NFL, because officials are conditioned to overreact at the best of times.
Grade: A

Dolphins – James, Ja’Wuan – OT – 6’6″ – 311 lbs – Tennessee – 5.7
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Chris Burke’s analysis:
Strengths: Absolutely fits the part of an NFL tackle at 6-foot-6 and 311 pounds. When he is able to control that size by driving it into opposing defenders, he can be a menace up front, both in the run and pass games. Advanced his game enough to project as an early NFL starter, with room to continue growing as a blocker once he gets to the next level. And speaking of the next level, James is quick-footed enough to throw his weight into a defensive lineman, then release to find a linebacker as well. On a team that wants to run the ball, James should be a definite asset.
Weaknesses: There’s work to be done here, mainly with technique. James can be caught too high, allowing defenders to shove him off-balance. He also will have to become more consistent in all aspects of his game – the flashes of dominance up front only come every so often, with some misses on his chart. Almost certainly will have to open his career as a RT, which is where he played throughout college. It’s hard to envision him being able to make the move to the left side with any regularity.
Grade: C

Saints – Cooks, Brandin – WR – 5’10” – 189 lbs – Oregon State – 5.9
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Doug Farrar’s analysis:
Strengths: Prolific receiver who gets the whole route tree and has experience in a pro-style offense. Cooks can make plays from just about anywhere in the formation – wide, in the slot, different points in trips and bunch concepts, and as a runner on jet sweeps and quick screens. Tremendous after-catch runner who can break a play wide open with a small opening off a short pass. Cooks has great straight-line speed, and he’s very hard to cover on angular routes (slants, drags, posts) because he’s able to maintain his speed from side to side. Has the downfield quickness to flat-out beat better cornerbacks on all kinds of vertical routes from the seam to the sideline.
Has a great natural ability with route cuts – Cooks can put his foot in the ground, change direction, and get right back up to speed in a big hurry. Very tough to cover on comebacks and curls. He’s practiced with stutters and foot fakes at the line, and at times, that’s all he’s going to need to get free for a long play. Excellent boundary receiver who keeps his eye on the sideline. Quick, gliding runner on sweeps; he could really befuddle defenses with this as Reggie Bush and Percy Harvin have. Doesn’t have the size to win vertical battles, but he’s always up for trying. Despite his size, Cooks hasn’t been injury-prone. Wasn’t asked to be much of a return man in college, but certainly has all the attributes to make that happen.
Weaknesses: Cooks’ size is an obvious limitation in a few ways – he will lose a lot of jump-ball battles against larger defensive backs, he’s not going to out-muscle defenders in traffic, and he can be edged out of erratically-thrown passes – it’s harder for him to fight to avoid interceptions because he’s not built to mix it up. And he’s going to get most of his NFL touchdowns from the field as opposed to beating people in the end zone and red zone. Could suffer when pressed at the line at the next level; Cooks will have to get separation in those situations with short-area quickness as opposed to muscle.
Grade: A

Packers – Clinton-Dix, Ha Ha – FS – 6’1″ – 208 lbs – Alabama – 5.9
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Chris Burke’s analysis:
Strengths: Clinton-Dix has the two things every NFL free safety needs – great feet and impressive quickness. He backpedals and redirects smoothly and with little trouble, which allows him to stick and stay on all kinds of routes. And he’s remarkably quick when it comes to driving down in run support, as well as moving to either sideline. Keeps the action in front of him, and does his best to avoid getting shaken on any kind of misdirection, despite his generally aggressive playing style. Has the size (6-1, 208) and speed to square up on running backs and receivers and bring them down. Understands how to deal with blockers – will rarely take a hit straight on and bounces off to make a play. Tackles with excellent form; looks to wrap more than he goes for the kill shot, and he does a terrific job of extending his body to catch quicker opponents. Gives tremendous effort at all times; he’s never really eliminated from a possible tackle as long as the play is still going. Can play well everywhere from true center field to the slot.
Weaknesses: Though he’s a generally disciplined player, there are inevitable aftereffects of Clinton-Dix’s style that show up on tape. He will flat-out miss tackles at times because he’s trying so hard to get where he needs to be, and better play-fake quarterbacks might have a field day with him at the NFL level. Will occasionally lose track of his target on quick angle routes unless he’s in position to redirect.
Grade: A

Browns – Manziel, Johnny – QB – 6’0″ – 207 lbs – Texas A&M – 6.1
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Doug Farrar’s analysis:
Strengths: With all the folderol about his on-field escapades and off-field persona, it’s quite possible that Manziel is still wildly underrated as a pure quarterback – but he has all the tools to succeed at any level. First, he’s not a run-around guy. He looks to pass first on designed pass plays, even when he’s flushed out of the pocket. He’s very light on his feet in the pocket, and when he has to run, he’s incredibly good at resetting and driving the ball downfield. Has an unusual feel for throwing accurately out of weird positions, which is both a positive and negative. When he drives the ball, he can make any throw from the deep fade to the skinny post to all manner of short and intermediate timing throws. Has a plus-arm, though it’s not a Howitzer, and he’s learned to put air under the ball to help receivers with their timing. He’s a master at extending plays beyond their logical conclusions and directing receivers along the way. Has an innate sense of how to create holes in pass coverage with motion and redirection, and he’s coming into the NFL at a time when this attribute is far more prized than it used to be.
Manziel isn’t just a scrambler, he’s an outstanding pure runner – when he calls his own number on draws, he gets up to speed quickly, reads gaps patiently and has an extra gear in the open field. He’s very quick to set and throw – once he makes his decision to throw, there’s very little delay or wasted motion. Can make deep, accurate throws across his body, even when on the run. In general, he’s a rare thrower when under duress.
Manziel showed specific and impressive improvements at his pro day, which proved that he’s been working hard in the offseason, and taking what performance coaches George Whitfield and Kevin O’Connell are teaching him very seriously. Clearly has the desire to improve, and seems to have an inherent chip on his shoulder when doubted. Despite all the talk about his personality, Manziel appears to be a born on-field leader who can rally his teammates. With words and actions, he seems to inspire belief.
Weaknesses: Manziel’s greatest strength is absolutely tied to his biggest weakness. His improvisational ability, while as impressive as any I’ve seen in a collegiate quarterback, has allowed him to get away with random and unrepeatable plays that won’t have the same shelf life in the NFL. Part of the problem is that he isn’t consistent with his mechanics – when he drives through the throw with his body, he’s as good a passer as there is in this draft class. But there are other times when he’ll miss wildly because he’s throwing off his back foot or off both feet, which limits how much torque he can generate. And though he can go through multiple reads at times, he’ll have to do that more at the NFL level. Right now, there’s a sandlot quality to his field vision that produces compelling results at times, but isn’t sustainable against more complex concepts. At times, his deeper throws hang in the air, which could lead to more picks in the NFL.
Played almost exclusively in shotgun and pistol formations at A&M, and though he displayed an ease with dropping back when playing under center, the NFL team that takes him as a dropback guy would have to cross its fingers at first. Being away from the center gives him a timing edge at the snap and helps him see the field.
Tends to arch back when he throws longer passes with arc – not necessarily a problem, but it’s unusual. It may be an adaptive strategy to counter the issue related to his height; at just under 6-feet tall, Manziel has to work his game in the same ways everyone from Fran Tarkenton to Drew Brees to Russell Wilson has. There are simply some throws he will not be able to make in the pocket because he can’t see what’s happening until he either creates line splits by running, or waits for them to open up. And at 207 pounds, there will be legitimate concerns about how well and how often he’ll be able to make plays on the run in designed situations. If that part of his play is reduced, that puts the pressure on him to do more as a passer – which he has the potential to do, but he’ll have to change some things about his modus operandi to make that happen.
Grade: A

Chiefs – Ford, Dee – DE – 6’2″ – 252 lbs – Auburn – 5.7
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Chris Burke’s analysis:
Strengths: As a pure pass-rusher, Ford comes off the snap with great velocity, which he’s able to turn into impressive power for his size (6-2, 252). Can bring a nascent bull-rush against tight ends and tackles from time to time, and will generally come up well in power battles as long as he gets his hands on blockers quickly. Ford has light feet and will jump gaps to stunt and use an inside counter to stay active and bring pressure. Forces offenses to align their blocking schemes to him pretty frequently; he faces a lot of tight end chips and double teams. Has the bend around the edge (dip-and-rip) to get under the pads of tackles and move quickly to create pocket disruption.
Ford shows estimable body control and discipline when he’s asked to read run plays and cover in short areas – he follows the action well and will adjust as a true linebacker (as opposed to a one-dimensional pass-rusher) might. Wasn’t asked to drop into coverage a lot, but has the potential to do so. Unlike a lot of outside linebacker conversion projects, Ford didn’t get washed out when he wasn’t given free space – he can excel in close quarters. Has long enough arms to pop blockers right off the snap.
Weaknesses: Ford could stand to use his hands better and more effectively – as active as he is, he’d be more purely disruptive if he had the ability to consistently redirect blockers with rip, spin and swim moves. And though his inside moves are decent, he will need to get quicker with his feet on those quick inside cuts and counters. Ford will lose blocks if he doesn’t gain quick leverage, such as plays when he’s chasing opponents. And he’ll need to develop his coverage technique at the next level – he tends to follow, and doesn’t turn his head.
Grade: C

Bengals – Dennard, Darqueze – CB – 5’11” – 199 lbs – Michigan State – 6.1
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Doug Farrar’s analysis:
Strengths: Receivers have to work to get off the line against Dennard, because he often plays up tight against them and prevents clean releases with his size and strength. Used his hands right up to the line of drawing penalties – jammed well, plus knew when he could and could not latch on downfield. Flips his hips quickly when he needs to. Dennard shows an impressive knack for knowing when to turn for the football, then rarely hesitates in making a play on it. Even when receivers do manage to find openings against him, Dennard can make their lives miserable. He contests passes through the catch, swatting and ripping at the football.-
Plays almost like an extra linebacker against the run. When there was not a receiver on his side of the field, he walked down to the edge of the line pre-snap and threw himself into the pile. If he was engaged on a run play, Dennard worked until the whistle to fend off his blocker. He tackles well for a cornerback, too, eschewing that shoulder-first approach for a shoulders-squared technique.
Dennard is clearly a confident defender, no matter what he is tasked with on the field.
Weaknesses: Clocked in just north of 4.5 seconds in the 40-yard dash at the combine, and that speaks to lingering concerns over his speed. Physical NFL receivers may not be as bothered by Dennard’s press coverage. So even if he shows the continued ability to smoothly turn and run, Dennard may lose some battles on deep balls. The average speed also all but eliminates the possibility that Dennard could work into a lineup as a slot guy (not that any team necessarily would want to play him there).
Issue No. 2 with Dennard’s game concerns his experience with Michigan State – the Spartans utilized almost exclusively man-to-man defenses, so the jury is out on how well Dennard would transition to a zone-heavy approach.
May unfairly be knocked for playing behind the aforementioned, dominant Michigan State front seven. As is often the case with college players who enjoyed such benefits, some will wonder if Dennard can provide the same type of supremacy if he lands on a team less imposing up front.
Grade: A-

Chargers – Verrett, Jason – CB – 5’9″ – 189 lbs – TCU – 5.9
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Chris Burke’s analysis:
Strengths: Excels at finding and playing the football, using those instincts to make up for any height or strength deficiencies. Drives on shorter routes, also gets his head around when running deep with receivers. Almost impossible for receivers to blow past him – Verrett ran a 4.38 40 at the combine, and might be the best CB in this draft when it comes to flipping his hips and breaking downfield. No issues moving around on defense, as TCU used him both in the slot and outside. Plenty capable of helping against the run, too, a nod to his physical nature. Welcomes matchups with star receivers.
Weaknesses: As if his size did not already pose a question mark for NFL teams, Verrett was banged up through much of last season. His willingness to enter the fray as a run defender worked to his detriment in that regard. Likely will have a very difficult time if asked to jam NFL receivers at the line, because of limited strength. Can be blocked out of plays with ease if a receiver/tight end manages to square him up. High-points the football, but will lose jump balls to taller receivers simply because of his limitations.
Grade: A-

Eagles – Smith, Marcus – DE – 6’3″ – 251 lbs – Louisville – 5.6
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Doug Farrar’s analysis:
Strengths: Smith has the size to succeed off the edge and to move inside in certain defensive packages, but his primary value lies in his array of pass-rush moves. He can dip-and rip, move with inside stunts and provide surprising run defense for his size. He can also cover in space decently.
Weaknesses: As with most LEO ends, Smith will struggle against double teams and bigger defenders – he’ll need to stay free in space to be productive.
Grade: B-

Cardinals – Bucannon, Deone – SS – 6’1″ – 211 lbs – Washington State – 5.7
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Chris Burke’s analysis:
Strengths: May rack up some flags in the NFL simply because of how heavy a hitter he is. Bucannon stands 6-foot-1 and just north of 210 pounds, and he brings the full force of that stature whenever he can from the safety spot. He ran a sub-4.5 40 at the combine, too, so there’s more to his game than just the highlight-reel hits. Bucannon can get to the ball, sideline to sideline, and make the necessary plays from the safety spot. He finished 2013 with six interceptions, and it appeared that he improved as the season went along – a good sign, no doubt, for the team that picks him.
Weaknesses: Bucannon makes more plays on the football than ex-Lion and current Dolphin Louis Delmas, but he plays with a similar mentality, in that his No. 1 goal appears to be to lay the boom. That’s well and good when he does so, yet the approach can leave him out of position and whiffing on tackles. He’s not great dropping, either, a trait that can be problematic for a deep safety, if he spends time there as opposed to in the box. Though his speed allows him to cover a lot of mistakes, faster receivers who run sharp routes will be able to get past him.
Grade: B

Panthers – Benjamin, Kelvin – WR – 6’5″ – 240 – Florida State – 6.1
Video
Doug Farrar’s analysis:
Strengths: Benjamin has prototypical dimensions (6-5, 240) for the position, and he understands how to use them – he will simply overwhelm defenders at times with his size, leaping ability and strength. And for his size, Benjamin has impressive straight-line speed. He’ll blast off the line quickly, he accelerates smoothly, and he has an extra gear downfield. Snatches the ball quickly and moves upfield just that way for extra yards after the catch, and he’s a load to deal with when he gets a full head of steam. Dominant red zone and end zone target who makes it nearly impossible to cover him in those situations, because all he has to do is get vertical and fight for the catch – and he does those things very well.
Outstanding blocker at all levels when he gives top effort. Can be a special player on simple slants and drags because he combines movement and strength when he does cut to an angle correctly. Played with quarterbacks who struggled to see the field and find him open at times; which could lead some NFL teams to (rightly) consider that he’ll have far more opportunities at the next level.
Weaknesses: For all his physical attributes, Benjamin is far from a finished product. He should be stronger with his hands in traffic than he is; even when he wins physical battles, he can be beaten after the catch with aggression, and he drops too many passes in general. Needs a lot of work on the overall route tree – ran a lot of straight go routes and simple angle concepts. Not always an aware player in space. He’s a bit logy when asked to cut quickly in short areas; this is where his big body (big butt, specifically) works against him. Agility is a question. Doesn’t always dig his foot in and make clean cuts, and as a result, he isn’t always where he needs to be when the ball is thrown with anticipation. Struggles with jukes and foot fakes because he’s still learning body control.
Will probably struggle with option routes for a while, because the ability to time his physical movements to the directions in his head is a process under development. Needs to learn to create separation. The little things – catching the ball with his hands instead of his body; waiting to turn upfield until he’s got the ball securely – are not quite there yet.
Grade: B

Patriots – Easley, Dominique – DT – 6’2″ – 288 lbs – Florida – 5.3
Video
Chris Burke’s analysis:
Strengths: Easley’s most prominent attribute is that he can play convincingly and at a starter level in so many gaps. There are multiple examples of him blowing up protections everywhere from 1-tech (between the center and guard) to 3-tech (between the guard and tackle) to end. He even has the speed and turn to disrupt from a wide-nine stance. For his size (6-foot-2, 288), Easley flashes tremendous upper-body strength – he plays 20 or 30 pounds heavier than he is in that sense, but he has the field speed and agility of a linebacker when he’s in space or covering in short areas. Gets his hands on blockers right off the snap and uses his hands very well – will use hand-strikes, swim and rip moves, and pure bull-rushes to drive through or get past to the backfield. Didn’t do a lot of stunting and looping for the Gators, but he clearly has the skillset to do so.
When lined up in a stunt formation (at a 45-degree angle against the line), Easley is just about unblockable because he gets through with such explosive speed. Understands leverage and will get under a blocker’s pads, adding to his strength advantage – it’s uncanny how often he’ll push a guy back who seriously outweighs him. Can split and move from gap to gap with great agility; he’s always looking for an opening. And when he gets in the backfield, Easley is very balanced and disciplined – he doesn’t fall for foot fakes and agile moves. At his best, he’s a play destroyer.
Weaknesses: Where Easley’s size shows up in a negative sense is when he’s asked to take on double teams, especially against bigger blockers – he tends to get eaten up and can’t always get through even with all his attributes. And if a blocker gets his hands on Easley first, it’s tough for Easley to recover consistently – his hand quickness is clearly an adaptive strategy, and it works well, but he’s got that issue.
Injury issues will hold him back, to be certain. Though he recovered well from the 2010 ACL tear, the fact that he’s now had serious injuries to each knee will certainly present a red flag that will drop him at least a full round from where he would go otherwise.
Grade: B+

49ers – Ward, Jimmie – SS – 5’11” – 193 lbs – Northern Illinois – 5.4
Video
Doug Farrar’s analysis:
Strengths: Plays well everywhere in the defensive backfield – from deep center field to slot cornerback. Ward has tremendous range and can cover a lot of ground in a big hurry, and he’s on point when he gets there – he doesn’t overreach as much as you’d expect for a player who’s going all-out at all times. Makes plays in the passing game from inside the seams to outside the numbers and can roll back into deep coverage from linebacker depth. Times his hits exceptionally well to deflect and break up passes. Ward plays a lot of slot coverage, and this may be his most appealing value to NFL teams. His footwork is outstanding, and his backpedal speed really shows up on tape. Doesn’t allow a lot of yards after the catch – if a receiver grabs a catch in his area, Ward is quick to end the play.
Weaknesses: Gets a bit stiff in coverage situations where he needs to turn his hips and run quickly in a straight line; not a natural mover in those circumstances. Though he can get vertical, Ward will be challenged by tight ends and bigger receivers – with his height, there’s only so high he can go. Takes on blockers fearlessly at the line of scrimmage, but needs to put on functional weight to deal with them – he’s a thin guy who struggles in physical battles and needs to shoot through gaps to tackle or blitz. Will occasionally bite on play-action and play-fakes because he’s so aggressive to the ball.
Grade: A+

Broncos – Roby, Bradley – CB – 5’11” – 194 lbs – Ohio State – 6.1
Video
Chris Burke’s analysis:
Strengths: Extremely physical player for his size (5-11, 194) who makes life particularly nightmarish for slot receivers. Uses a long wingspan and terrific timing to move in and bat the ball away just as his receiver is about to make the catch. That physicality extends to his tackling ability, which starts in the backfield – Roby heads to the running back like a missile and understands how to bring bigger players down. He would be an excellent option on cornerback blitzes from the slot because he times them perfectly, and his coverage abilities place him there very nicely. As a pure press cornerback, Roby excels because he can follow his receivers wherever they go, and he also reads the running game as he’s covering. Has the straight-line speed to catch up with just about any runner and make a stop.
Weaknesses: Roby needs work on his off-coverage – it could have been a product of scheme at Ohio State, but he allowed far too many easy completions underneath when in off-coverage by giving up too much of a cushion. Though he has legitimate sub-4.4 speed, Roby struggles with recovery quickness when he’s been beaten; he needs to learn to hit corners and angles with more acceleration. Doesn’t turn his hips as fluidly as he should when playing bail technique. Height disadvantage shows up when he’s playing trail coverage and tries to get vertical against bigger receivers – unless he times it perfectly, he’s going to get out-jumped. Occasionally tries to bat the ball away when he should stick and stay with the target.
Grade: B+

Vikings – Bridgewater, Teddy – QB – 6’2″ – 214 lbs – Louisville – 6.1
Video
Doug Farrar’s analysis:
Strengths: Of all the quarterbacks in this class, Bridgewater has the best and most comprehensive command of the little things that help signal-callers at the next level. He is a true multi-read quarterback who doesn’t have to rely on his first option. He takes the ball cleanly from center, and his footwork on the drop is clean and variable – that is to say, he can drop straight back or seamlessly head into motion throws. And on the move, Bridgewater runs to throw. He keeps his shoulders squared and his eyes active, allowing him to make some difficult deep and intermediate throws on boot-action left, when he’s throwing across his body on the run. And when under pressure in and out of the pocket, he still looks to get the ball out – he’ll elude and throw his way out of trouble (again, for the most part). In a general sense, Bridgewater is a very resourceful player – he looks to make the most of what he’s got. Sees the field peripherally – Bridgewater has a good sense of converging coverage, and he understands the timing of the throw. And though his deep ball is nothing to write home about, he does have a nice arc in his deeper timing throws when he needs to.
Mechanically, there’s nothing that really beguiles Bridgewater on a consistent basis – he’s generally decisive, he has a very quick overhand release (used to have a problem with sidearm, but he’s clearly working on it) and he uses his lower body to gain velocity. Even when he’s throwing off-angle from weird spots, he’s trained himself to keep proper mechanics, which is something you can’t yet say about Johnny Manziel.
Weaknesses: Bridgewater’s desire to make plays on the move occasionally results in needless sacks, as he will at times hold onto the ball too long. Occasional mental and mechanical lapses will lead to erratic throws, and though too much has been generally made of this in the media, it’s an issue that his NFL coach will have to clean up. This is especially true on his deep passes, which will sail wildly at times. And though he’s functionally mobile, he’s not a true runner – he’s going to make a difference as a quarterback, not a slash player.
Grade: A+

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Click HERE to view results of ROUNDS 2 & 3.

Click HERE to view results of ROUNDS 4 THROUGH 7.

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*VIDEO* Rick Santelli Reacts To .01% GDP Growth In First Quarter


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2014 College Grads Get Diplomas, Not Jobs – Washington Free Beacon

Graduating college seniors face a grim job market little improved since President Barack Obama’s reelection, and many say they are concerned about their future.

The effective unemployment rate, referred to as U-6, now stands at 15.6 percent for the youth, ages 18 to 29. U-6 adjusts for labor force participation by including those who have given up looking for work. That rate since 2012 has only improved slightly, from 16.4 percent.

The unemployment picture for others in this age group remains stubbornly high. For African Americans, the U-6 rate is at 23.6 percent, the rate for Hispanics stands at 16.2 percent and the rate for women is currently at 13.3 percent.

College seniors are frustrated by their inability to land a job.

Lauren Dwyer of Hampshire, Ill., who is graduating from Aurora University this week with a major in English Education, has yet to find a job. She said she has been looking since March.

“I applied to 50 jobs and have had no interviews,” Dwyer said. “It’s very competitive. I’ve been told there are roughly over 1,000 applications applying to teaching jobs every day.”

Dwyer has $25,000 in student loans she must start repaying in October. She says she will be living at home with her parents. “I knew it would take some effort, but I didn’t know it would be this difficult” to find a job, she said.

Justin Roth, of Lancaster, Pa., who is graduating from Lebanon Valley College, is in a similar position. Roth has landed an internship, which he said was not an easy task. While interning, he hopes to network for a full-time job. “I’m looking for a full-time job, and hopefully can get one from a client,” Roth said.

Like Dwyer, Roth said he will move back home and hopefully will move out on his own if he gets a full-time job.

“I haven’t heard of any friends getting full-time jobs,” Roth said. “Most of my friends have gotten internships.”

According to Generation Opportunity, 1.916 million young adults are not counted as “unemployed” by the U.S. Department of Labor because they are not in the labor force. These young people have given up searching for work due to the lack of jobs.

“It’s very frustrating. Sometimes the official unemployment rate goes down because people stop looking and older people decide to retire. Young people can’t retire,” said Corie Whalen, spokesperson for Generation Opportunity.

Even more alarming is how many college graduates are stuck in positions that are unrelated to their field of study.

“Young people aren’t even using their college degrees in their work,” Whalen said. The latest data shows approximately 50 percent of young people are in that situation.

The struggle is not limited to college graduates.

Adele Coghlan, 18, of Chester, Pa., will be attending Westchester University in the fall and majoring in psychology. She has been looking for work to support herself and save for college. She has been unsuccessful.

“It’s really hard. I’m from a small town. The first day an ad goes up, the job is taken,” Coghlan said. She said the prospects for her future “really concerns me.”

“I do not want to be a boomerang,” Coghlan said, “I don’t want to return home when I am done with college.” But that is a distinct possibility, according to Coghlan. “That’s an issue for a lot of people. They want to be independent, but the job market is so tough right now.” Many of her friends, she said, are in the same situation as she is.

“My parents provide for me,” Coghlan said. “I feel bad about it. I have siblings and I should be able to support myself. I feel bad that I am taking away from my brothers,” Coghlan said.

Click HERE For Rest Of Story

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*VIDEOS* 2014 NRA-ILA Leadership Forum: Featuring Mark Levin, Rick Santorum And Sheriff David Clarke


MARK LEVIN

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BOBBY JINDAL

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CHRIS COX

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DAVID CLARKE

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DAN COATS

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MARCO RUBIO

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MIKE PENCE

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ADAM VINATIERI

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WAYNE LAPIERRE

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RICK SANTORUM

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ED PULIDO

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Click HERE to visit the NRA’s official website.

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Happy Saint Patrick’s Day From The Daley Gator!


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Who Is St. Patrick?

People all over the world celebrate on the 17th day of March in honor of St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland. Some cities have parades, most revelers wear green, and a few families commemorate the day with traditional Irish fare for their meal. However, not everyone may know who St. Patrick is.

Born in Britain during the 4th century, St. Patrick was kidnapped and enslaved by Irish raiders when he was a teenager. Although he was able to escape after six years and become a priest in Britain, he later chose to return to Ireland as a missionary, in order to help spread the teachings of Christianity to pagans. According to Irish folklore, he also used a shamrock to explain the Christian concept of Trinity to the Irish. In spite of continuous opposition from pagan leaders, he continued to evangelize for thirty years while baptizing newly converted Christians and establishing monasteries, churches, and schools. He died on March 17th and was canonized by the local church.

St. Patrick’s Day was first publicly celebrated in Boston in 1737 where a large population of Irish immigrants resided. Nearly 200 years later, the first St. Patrick’s Day parade in the Irish Free State was held in Dublin in 1931. During the mid 90’s, the Irish government also began a campaign to promote tourism in Ireland on March 17th.

While many Catholics still quietly celebrate this day of religious observance by going to mass, St. Patrick’s Day has evolved to become a celebration of Irish heritage. Through the years many symbols have been included in festivities that are reflective of Ireland’s folklore, culture, and national identity (think leprechauns, shamrocks and wearing green). Other places that join in on this celebration include Japan, New Zealand, Argentina, and Canada, along with many cities across the United States.

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SAINT PATRICK’S DAY 2014 – DUBLIN IRELAND (PART 1)

PART 2
PART 3
PART 4
PART 5
PART 6
PART 7
PART 8
PART 9
PART 10
PART 11
PART 12
PART 13
PART 14
PART 15
PART 16
PART 17
PART 18
PART 19
PART 20
PART 21

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*VIDEOS* CPAC 2014 (Day 3) – Featuring Newt Gingrich, Ben Carson, Jim DeMint And Sarah Palin


NEWT GINGRICH

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CARLY FIORINA

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BEN CARSON

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JIM BANKS

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ANN COULTER / MICKEY KAUS DEBATE

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JIM DEMINT

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ERIKA HAROLD

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DANIEL HANNAN

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LEE ZELDIN

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SARAH PALIN

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ENTIRE EVENT

……………………….Click on image above to watch video.

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Click HERE to visit the official CPAC website.

CPAC is hosted by the American Conservative Union.

Click HERE for videos from Day 1 of event.

Click HERE for videos from Day 2 of event.

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*VIDEOS* CPAC 2014 (Day 2) – Featuring Rick Perry, Oliver North, Rick Santorum And Rand Paul


RICK PERRY

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RALPH REED

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OLIVER NORTH

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JOHN CORNYN

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HOLLYWOOD CONSERVATIVES (PANEL) – DINESH D’SOUZA (SPEECH)

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DINESH D’SOUZA’S ‘AMERICA’ (MOVIE TRAILER)

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RICK SANTORUM

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AL CARDENAS

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RAND PAUL

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ENTIRE EVENT

……………………….Click on image above to watch video.

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Click HERE to visit the official CPAC website.

CPAC is hosted by the American Conservative Union.

Click HERE for videos from Day 1 of event.

Click HERE for videos from Day 3 of event.

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