And he wonders why no one wants to sign him?

Colin Kaepernick traded his NFL career in for a new line of work. Something more lucrative. Professional victim! Pretend Victim hood anyone? 

Today, while real football players play football, grotesquely overpaid (thanks Nike!) professional moonbat Colin Kaepernick gripes about how much he hates America. He was doing the same thing on Thursday, while the rest of us celebrated Thanksgiving. Just like last year, Kaepernick celebrated “Unthanksgiving” instead.

Via Fox News:

On Thursday, Kaepernick spoke at the “Indigenous People’s Sunrise Ceremony,” also known as “Unthanksgiving,” on Alcatraz Island in San Francisco, California

So as to spread the misery of his festering hatred of this great country, he sent out a tweet accusing America of having “stolen over 1.5 billion acres of land from Indigenous people.”

Wonder if he is aware that those indigenous people, fought each other, and did some pretty bad things at times?

The significance of warfare varied tremendously among the hundreds of pre‐Columbian Native American societies, and its meanings and implications changed dramatically for all of them after European contact. Among the more densely populated Eastern Woodland cultures, warfare often served as a means of coping with grief and depopulation. Such conflict, commonly known as a “mourning war,” usually began at the behest of women who had lost a son or husband and desired the group’s male warriors to capture individuals from other groups who could replace those they had lost. Captives might help maintain a stable population or appease the grief of bereaved relatives: if the women of the tribe so demanded, captives would be ritually tortured, sometimes to death if the captive was deemed unfit for adoption into the tribe. Because the aim in warfare was to acquire captives, quick raids, as opposed to pitched battles, predominated. Warfare in Eastern Woodland cultures also allowed young males to acquire prestige or status through the demonstration of martial skill and courage. Conflicts among these groups thus stemmed as much from internal social reasons as from external relations with neighbors. Territory and commerce provided little impetus to fight.

On the Western Plains, pre‐Columbian warfare—before the introduction of horses and guns—pitted tribes against one another for control of territory and its resources, as well as for captives and honor. Indian forces marched on foot to attack rival tribes who sometimes resided in palisaded villages. Before the arrival of the horse and gun, battles could last days, and casualties could number in the hundreds; thereafter, both Plains Indian culture and the character and meaning of war changed dramatically. The horse facilitated quick, long‐distance raids to acquire goods. Warfare became more individualistic and less bloody: an opportunity for adolescent males to acquire prestige through demonstrations of courage. It became more honorable for a warrior to touch his enemy (to count “coup”) or steal his horse than to kill him.

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