Why do we release violent felons?

One aspect never brought up in the discussion over “gun violence” is how many times the bad guy has been released from prison despite a long violent record

When Daryl Williams stepped in front of Cook County Judge Stephanie Miller on Wednesday, it wasn’t the first time the two had seen each other. Back in November, Miller—a champion of the county’s “affordable bail” movement—let Williams go free on a recognizance bond after he was charged with possessing a stolen handgun on the South Side.

While free awaiting trial on the handgun charge, Williams obtained another gun and fatally shot a man in the back of the head, police say. Arrested this week, Williams just happened to find himself in front of Judge Miller again.

In short, a man died because of lax laws, and it happens a lot Here is more

The Left hates everything that came out of the late 1980’s Get Tough on Crime initiatives. But violent crime peaked in this country around 1991 or so, and even with the increase we’ve seen in the past 3 years or so it is still near historic lows, at least in most of the country. (Chicago, Baltimore and a few other places are notable exceptions to that statement.)

In an effort to turn back some of that tough on crime stuff, Cook County (home to Chicago) is trying to go easy on defendants who might have a hard time affording bail. In some case releasing criminals on their own recognizance. Which brings us to the case in point.

A guy bought an illegal gun, that was originally stolen from Spokane. He fired a couple of shots to “be sure it worked.” He got busted for illegal possession of a firearm. Released – no bond, no electronic monitoring. He was just left to walk out the door. He skipped his hearing. (Color me shocked!) While out awaiting that hearing, he bought another gun. He used that gun to shoot a man in the back of the head.

Williams was released, and he killed someone. And the left can only blame the NRA?

2 thoughts on “Why do we release violent felons?”

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